The transition toward electric mobility is recognised as a powerful contributor to reaching the goal of reducing en-vironmental pressure from the transport sector minimizing greenhouse gas emissions. Over recent years several studies analysed the economic convenience of adopting electric vehicles as well as its impact on greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. However, very few studies evaluated both economic cost and environmental emissions in a real-life environment. This study aimed to investigate the economic costs of battery electric vehicle adoption in the short food supply chain and its impact on the environment in terms of greenhouse gas emissions when com-pared to corresponding petrol-powered vehicles. It also aimed to examine the influence of policy measures on this transition process. To achieve these objectives, data were obtained from market research and the testing phase of a project co-funded by the European Interreg Med Programme. Based on collected data, economic cost and greenhouse gas emission of both battery electric vehicle and internal combustion engine vehicle use were de-termined. The results emphasise that when compared to corresponding petrol-powered vehicles, the economic convenience of electric vehicles as well as their positive impact on greenhouse gas emissions is evident after a finite distance is covered, which grows thereafter. Simulated scenarios confirm the importance of the incentives for vehi-cle acquisition promoted by governments to reduce their economic cost, whilst also confirming the influence that an energy mix consisting of renewable energy sources could have on achieving the environmental benefits of adopting electric vehicles over a shorter period and distance. In light of these results, some recommendations can be provided to promote the spread of battery electric vehicles in the short food supply chain. In detail, financial sup-port is needed to both purchase battery electric vehicles and support projects to obtain lower-cost batteries. At the same time, a great effort should be made by policymakers to create an efficient network of recharging infrastruc-tures also powered by alternative energies to further reduce greenhouse gas emissions.(c) 2023 Institution of Chemical Engineers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Galati A., Adamashvili N., Crescimanno M. (2023). A feasibility analysis on adopting electric vehicles in the short food supply chain based on GHG emissions and economic costs estimations. SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION, 36, 49-61 [10.1016/j.spc.2023.01.001].

A feasibility analysis on adopting electric vehicles in the short food supply chain based on GHG emissions and economic costs estimations

Galati A.
Primo
;
Adamashvili N.;Crescimanno M.
Ultimo
2023-03-01

Abstract

The transition toward electric mobility is recognised as a powerful contributor to reaching the goal of reducing en-vironmental pressure from the transport sector minimizing greenhouse gas emissions. Over recent years several studies analysed the economic convenience of adopting electric vehicles as well as its impact on greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. However, very few studies evaluated both economic cost and environmental emissions in a real-life environment. This study aimed to investigate the economic costs of battery electric vehicle adoption in the short food supply chain and its impact on the environment in terms of greenhouse gas emissions when com-pared to corresponding petrol-powered vehicles. It also aimed to examine the influence of policy measures on this transition process. To achieve these objectives, data were obtained from market research and the testing phase of a project co-funded by the European Interreg Med Programme. Based on collected data, economic cost and greenhouse gas emission of both battery electric vehicle and internal combustion engine vehicle use were de-termined. The results emphasise that when compared to corresponding petrol-powered vehicles, the economic convenience of electric vehicles as well as their positive impact on greenhouse gas emissions is evident after a finite distance is covered, which grows thereafter. Simulated scenarios confirm the importance of the incentives for vehi-cle acquisition promoted by governments to reduce their economic cost, whilst also confirming the influence that an energy mix consisting of renewable energy sources could have on achieving the environmental benefits of adopting electric vehicles over a shorter period and distance. In light of these results, some recommendations can be provided to promote the spread of battery electric vehicles in the short food supply chain. In detail, financial sup-port is needed to both purchase battery electric vehicles and support projects to obtain lower-cost batteries. At the same time, a great effort should be made by policymakers to create an efficient network of recharging infrastruc-tures also powered by alternative energies to further reduce greenhouse gas emissions.(c) 2023 Institution of Chemical Engineers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
mar-2023
Settore AGR/01 - Economia Ed Estimo Rurale
Galati A., Adamashvili N., Crescimanno M. (2023). A feasibility analysis on adopting electric vehicles in the short food supply chain based on GHG emissions and economic costs estimations. SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION, 36, 49-61 [10.1016/j.spc.2023.01.001].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/607814
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