Introduction: Gender medicine is an innovative medical approach that studies how some biological variables are influenced by the male or female sex and gender. This issue is under debate because it characterizes the impact of tailored or individual medicine. In this scenario, the aim of this study is to study the correlation between heavy metal exposure and pathologies of neurodevelopment, according to the sex of newborns. In particular, this is an observational study under the name of the Neurosviluppo Project, involving 217 mother-child couples. Material and methods: The correlation with phenotype small for gestational age and congenital malformations were studied, but above all we focused on the pattern of placental permeability to heavy metals. Results: Our results are specifically related to foetal medicine and investigate the impact of foetal sex in transplacental metal exposure. Our results did not show any significant differences related to foetal sex in terms of congenital malformations or the other variables taken into consideration. However, because these conclusions are the first related to the gender medicine in transplacental foetal medicine, they could be a marked background for further studies. Conclusions: Considering the lack of data in literature regarding foetal sexual medicine and transplacental exposure, these study results are pioneering in terms of sexual foetal medicine. Possibly in the future, studies regarding the correlation between foetal sex and obstetrics outcomes will be performed.

Giordano, G., Gullo, G., Scaglione, M., Buzzaccarini, G., Cucinella, G., Gullo, D., et al. (2023). Transplacental permeability of heavy metals in relation to newborn sex - evidence from the neurodevelopment project. PRZEGLAD MENOPAUZALNY, 22(1), 30-36 [10.5114/pm.2023.126437].

Transplacental permeability of heavy metals in relation to newborn sex - evidence from the neurodevelopment project

Cucinella, Gaspare;Chiantera, Vito;Laganà, Antonio Simone;Di Gaudio, Francesca
2023-03-01

Abstract

Introduction: Gender medicine is an innovative medical approach that studies how some biological variables are influenced by the male or female sex and gender. This issue is under debate because it characterizes the impact of tailored or individual medicine. In this scenario, the aim of this study is to study the correlation between heavy metal exposure and pathologies of neurodevelopment, according to the sex of newborns. In particular, this is an observational study under the name of the Neurosviluppo Project, involving 217 mother-child couples. Material and methods: The correlation with phenotype small for gestational age and congenital malformations were studied, but above all we focused on the pattern of placental permeability to heavy metals. Results: Our results are specifically related to foetal medicine and investigate the impact of foetal sex in transplacental metal exposure. Our results did not show any significant differences related to foetal sex in terms of congenital malformations or the other variables taken into consideration. However, because these conclusions are the first related to the gender medicine in transplacental foetal medicine, they could be a marked background for further studies. Conclusions: Considering the lack of data in literature regarding foetal sexual medicine and transplacental exposure, these study results are pioneering in terms of sexual foetal medicine. Possibly in the future, studies regarding the correlation between foetal sex and obstetrics outcomes will be performed.
mar-2023
Settore MED/40 - Ginecologia E Ostetricia
Giordano, G., Gullo, G., Scaglione, M., Buzzaccarini, G., Cucinella, G., Gullo, D., et al. (2023). Transplacental permeability of heavy metals in relation to newborn sex - evidence from the neurodevelopment project. PRZEGLAD MENOPAUZALNY, 22(1), 30-36 [10.5114/pm.2023.126437].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/590632
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