The use of illicit and non-illicit substances is widespread in suicides. The toxicological data may help in understanding the mechanism of death. This systematic review aimed to analyze autopsies related to suicides by consuming poison, focusing on the correlation between substance use and the country of origin to create an alarm bell to indicate that suicide maybe attempted and prevent it. The systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines, with the primary objective of identifying autopsies conducted in cases of suicide by consuming poison in specific geographic areas. Significant differences in substances were observed between low-income and Western countries that confirm previous literature data. In rural areas and Asian countries, most suicides by consuming poison involve the use of pesticides, such as organophosphates and carbamates. In Western countries, illicit drugs and medically prescribed drugs are the leading cause of suicide by self-poisoning. Future research should shed light on the correlation between social, medical, and demographic characteristics and the autopsy findings in suicides by self-poisoning to highlight the risk factors and implement tailored prevention programs worldwide. Performing a complete autopsy on a suspected suicide by self-poisoning could be essential in supporting worldwide public health measures and policy makers. Therefore, complete autopsies in such cases must be vigorously promoted.

Albano G.D., Malta G., La Spina C., Rifiorito A., Provenzano V., Triolo V., et al. (2022). Toxicological Findings of Self-Poisoning Suicidal Deaths: A Systematic Review by Countries. TOXICS, 10(11) [10.3390/toxics10110654].

Toxicological Findings of Self-Poisoning Suicidal Deaths: A Systematic Review by Countries

Albano G. D.
Primo
;
Malta G.;La Spina C.;Rifiorito A.;Provenzano V.;Triolo V.;Bertol E.;Zerbo S.;Argo A.
Ultimo
2022-10-29

Abstract

The use of illicit and non-illicit substances is widespread in suicides. The toxicological data may help in understanding the mechanism of death. This systematic review aimed to analyze autopsies related to suicides by consuming poison, focusing on the correlation between substance use and the country of origin to create an alarm bell to indicate that suicide maybe attempted and prevent it. The systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines, with the primary objective of identifying autopsies conducted in cases of suicide by consuming poison in specific geographic areas. Significant differences in substances were observed between low-income and Western countries that confirm previous literature data. In rural areas and Asian countries, most suicides by consuming poison involve the use of pesticides, such as organophosphates and carbamates. In Western countries, illicit drugs and medically prescribed drugs are the leading cause of suicide by self-poisoning. Future research should shed light on the correlation between social, medical, and demographic characteristics and the autopsy findings in suicides by self-poisoning to highlight the risk factors and implement tailored prevention programs worldwide. Performing a complete autopsy on a suspected suicide by self-poisoning could be essential in supporting worldwide public health measures and policy makers. Therefore, complete autopsies in such cases must be vigorously promoted.
29-ott-2022
Albano G.D., Malta G., La Spina C., Rifiorito A., Provenzano V., Triolo V., et al. (2022). Toxicological Findings of Self-Poisoning Suicidal Deaths: A Systematic Review by Countries. TOXICS, 10(11) [10.3390/toxics10110654].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/581016
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