The exsolution, rise, expansion, and separation of volatiles from magma provide the driving force behind both effusive and explosive volcanic eruptions. The field of volcanic gas geochemistry therefore plays a key role in understanding volcanism. In this article, we summarize the most important findings of the past few decades and how these shape today’s understanding of volcanic degassing. We argue that the recent advent of automated, continuous geochemical monitoring at volcanoes now allows us to track activity from unrest to eruption, thus providing valuable insights into the behavior of volatiles throughout the entire sequence. In the next 10 years, the volcanological community stands to benefit from the expansion of geochemical monitoring networks to many more active volcanoes. This, along with technical advances in instrumentation and in particular the increasing role that unoccupied aircraft systems (UAS) and satellite-based observations are likely to play in collecting volcanic gas measurements, will provide a rich dataset for testing hypotheses and developing diagnostic tools for eruption forecasts. The use of consistent, well-documented analytical methods and ensuring free, public access to the collected data with few restrictions will be most beneficial to the advancement of volcanic gas science.

Kern C., Aiuppa A., de Moor J.M. (2022). A golden era for volcanic gas geochemistry?. BULLETIN OF VOLCANOLOGY, 84(5) [10.1007/s00445-022-01556-6].

A golden era for volcanic gas geochemistry?

Aiuppa A.;
2022-04-01

Abstract

The exsolution, rise, expansion, and separation of volatiles from magma provide the driving force behind both effusive and explosive volcanic eruptions. The field of volcanic gas geochemistry therefore plays a key role in understanding volcanism. In this article, we summarize the most important findings of the past few decades and how these shape today’s understanding of volcanic degassing. We argue that the recent advent of automated, continuous geochemical monitoring at volcanoes now allows us to track activity from unrest to eruption, thus providing valuable insights into the behavior of volatiles throughout the entire sequence. In the next 10 years, the volcanological community stands to benefit from the expansion of geochemical monitoring networks to many more active volcanoes. This, along with technical advances in instrumentation and in particular the increasing role that unoccupied aircraft systems (UAS) and satellite-based observations are likely to play in collecting volcanic gas measurements, will provide a rich dataset for testing hypotheses and developing diagnostic tools for eruption forecasts. The use of consistent, well-documented analytical methods and ensuring free, public access to the collected data with few restrictions will be most beneficial to the advancement of volcanic gas science.
Kern C., Aiuppa A., de Moor J.M. (2022). A golden era for volcanic gas geochemistry?. BULLETIN OF VOLCANOLOGY, 84(5) [10.1007/s00445-022-01556-6].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/576295
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