Perinatal manipulations can lead to neurobehavioural changes in the progeny. In this study we investigated, in adolescent male rat offspring, the consequences of a single, intense prenatal stress induced by a 120 min-maternal immobilization at gestational day 16, and of a daily, brief maternal separation from postnatal day 2 until 21, on: unconditioned fear/anxiety-like behaviour in open field and in elevated plus-maze; learning performance in the “Can test”, a non-aversive spatial and tactile/visual task; corticosterone plasma levels under basal and stress-induced conditions. Our results indicate that both prenatal stress and maternal separation procedures decrease emotionality and enhance learning performance. Maternal separation potentiates prenatal stress-induced effects in enhancing learning performance. Both basal and stress-induced corticosterone plasma levels are reduced following prenatal stress, maternal separation and the combination of two procedures. These findings suggest that a single, intense prenatal stress can enhance the adaptive stress-related responses in the progeny, probably due to the involvement of maternal factors. The synergistic fect of prenatal stress and maternal separation on learning performance may be due to a further damping of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis response in the progeny that better cope with the task administered.

CANNIZZARO, C., PLESCIA, F., MARTIRE, M., GAGLIANO, M., CANNIZZARO, G., MANTIA, G., et al. (2006). SINGLE, INTENSE PRENATAL STRESS DECREASES EMOTIONALITY AND ENHANCES LEARNING PERFORMANCE IN THE ADOLESCENT RAT OFFSPRING: INTERACTION WITH A BRIEF, DAILY, MATERNAL SEPARATION. BEHAVIOURAL BRAIN RESEARCH, 169(1), 128-136 [10.1016/j.bbr.2005.12.010].

SINGLE, INTENSE PRENATAL STRESS DECREASES EMOTIONALITY AND ENHANCES LEARNING PERFORMANCE IN THE ADOLESCENT RAT OFFSPRING: INTERACTION WITH A BRIEF, DAILY, MATERNAL SEPARATION

CANNIZZARO, Carla;PLESCIA, Fulvio;CANNIZZARO, Gaspare;MANTIA, Giacoma;CANNIZZARO, Emanuele
2006-01-01

Abstract

Perinatal manipulations can lead to neurobehavioural changes in the progeny. In this study we investigated, in adolescent male rat offspring, the consequences of a single, intense prenatal stress induced by a 120 min-maternal immobilization at gestational day 16, and of a daily, brief maternal separation from postnatal day 2 until 21, on: unconditioned fear/anxiety-like behaviour in open field and in elevated plus-maze; learning performance in the “Can test”, a non-aversive spatial and tactile/visual task; corticosterone plasma levels under basal and stress-induced conditions. Our results indicate that both prenatal stress and maternal separation procedures decrease emotionality and enhance learning performance. Maternal separation potentiates prenatal stress-induced effects in enhancing learning performance. Both basal and stress-induced corticosterone plasma levels are reduced following prenatal stress, maternal separation and the combination of two procedures. These findings suggest that a single, intense prenatal stress can enhance the adaptive stress-related responses in the progeny, probably due to the involvement of maternal factors. The synergistic fect of prenatal stress and maternal separation on learning performance may be due to a further damping of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis response in the progeny that better cope with the task administered.
CANNIZZARO, C., PLESCIA, F., MARTIRE, M., GAGLIANO, M., CANNIZZARO, G., MANTIA, G., et al. (2006). SINGLE, INTENSE PRENATAL STRESS DECREASES EMOTIONALITY AND ENHANCES LEARNING PERFORMANCE IN THE ADOLESCENT RAT OFFSPRING: INTERACTION WITH A BRIEF, DAILY, MATERNAL SEPARATION. BEHAVIOURAL BRAIN RESEARCH, 169(1), 128-136 [10.1016/j.bbr.2005.12.010].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/7749
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