: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease characterized by self-immune tolerance breakdown and the production of autoantibodies, causing the deposition of immune complexes and triggering inflammation and immune-mediated damage. SLE pathogenesis involves genetic predisposition and a combination of environmental factors. Clinical manifestations are variable, making an early diagnosis challenging. Heat shock proteins (Hsps), belonging to the chaperone system, interact with the immune system, acting as pro-inflammatory factors, autoantigens, as well as immune tolerance promoters. Increased levels of some Hsps and the production of autoantibodies against them are correlated with SLE onset and progression. The production of these autoantibodies has been attributed to molecular mimicry, occurring upon viral and bacterial infections, since they are evolutionary highly conserved. Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been associated with the occurrence and severity of SLE. Numerous findings suggest that proteins and metabolites of commensal bacteria can mimic autoantigens, inducing autoimmunity, because of molecular mimicry. Here, we propose that shared epitopes between human Hsps and those of gut commensal bacteria cause the production of anti-Hsp autoantibodies that cross-react with human molecules, contributing to SLE pathogenesis. Thus, the involvement of the chaperone system, gut microbiota dysbiosis, and molecular mimicry in SLE ought to be coordinately studied.

Vitale, A.M., Paladino, L., Caruso Bavisotto, C., Barone, R., Rappa, F., Conway de Macario, E., et al. (2024). Interplay between the Chaperone System and Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Pathogenesis: Is Molecular Mimicry the Missing Link between Those Two Factors? [10.3390/ijms25115608].

Interplay between the Chaperone System and Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Pathogenesis: Is Molecular Mimicry the Missing Link between Those Two Factors?

Vitale, Alessandra Maria
;
Paladino, Letizia;Caruso Bavisotto, Celeste;Barone, Rosario
;
Rappa, Francesca;Cappello, Francesco;Marino Gammazza, Antonella
2024-05-21

Abstract

: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease characterized by self-immune tolerance breakdown and the production of autoantibodies, causing the deposition of immune complexes and triggering inflammation and immune-mediated damage. SLE pathogenesis involves genetic predisposition and a combination of environmental factors. Clinical manifestations are variable, making an early diagnosis challenging. Heat shock proteins (Hsps), belonging to the chaperone system, interact with the immune system, acting as pro-inflammatory factors, autoantigens, as well as immune tolerance promoters. Increased levels of some Hsps and the production of autoantibodies against them are correlated with SLE onset and progression. The production of these autoantibodies has been attributed to molecular mimicry, occurring upon viral and bacterial infections, since they are evolutionary highly conserved. Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been associated with the occurrence and severity of SLE. Numerous findings suggest that proteins and metabolites of commensal bacteria can mimic autoantigens, inducing autoimmunity, because of molecular mimicry. Here, we propose that shared epitopes between human Hsps and those of gut commensal bacteria cause the production of anti-Hsp autoantibodies that cross-react with human molecules, contributing to SLE pathogenesis. Thus, the involvement of the chaperone system, gut microbiota dysbiosis, and molecular mimicry in SLE ought to be coordinately studied.
21-mag-2024
Vitale, A.M., Paladino, L., Caruso Bavisotto, C., Barone, R., Rappa, F., Conway de Macario, E., et al. (2024). Interplay between the Chaperone System and Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Pathogenesis: Is Molecular Mimicry the Missing Link between Those Two Factors? [10.3390/ijms25115608].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/642173
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