The “Communities’ Sustainable eXperiences - Urban Thinkers Campus” opened with an interview featuring Emeritus Professor Federico Maria Butera discussing his book “Sole, Vento, and Acqua” (Manifestolibri, 2023). Butera emphasizes that transitioning to renewable energy requires more than just replacing fossil fuels; it demands a fundamental shift in our economic and cultural frameworks toward a circular economy. He characterizes the global predicament as needing a profound “bifurcation” in our approach to sustainable development, drawing on a concept from dynamical systems where small changes in parameters lead to significant shifts in behavior. The interview addresses the challenges of regions like Madonie, facing depopulation and limited services, and suggests that sustainable practices can rejuvenate such areas. Butera advocates for a comprehensive strategy combining sustainable agriculture, innovative waste management, and fostering urban-rural synergies. This approach emphasizes local production and consumption, reducing environmental impact and strengthening community bonds. Butera highlights the critical role of local authorities in supporting policies that promote direct trade, repair, reuse, and small-scale production. He stresses the need to adjust consumption patterns and focus on sustainability, particularly among the youth. He encourages young people to be informed, critically evaluate information, and actively engage in their communities for sustainable change. The discussion underscores the link between environmental sustainability, societal welfare, and political action, emphasizing collaborative efforts to achieve a sustainable and equitable world. Butera’s closing thoughts highlight the necessity of proactive and thoughtful design to avoid social and environmental disasters. This aligns with Terry Irwin’s “transition design” framework, advocating for systemic change rather than incremental shifts. Butera's emphasis on “bifurcation” encourages designers to identify and influence critical crossroads within societal systems, enabling substantial changes toward sustainability. This approach challenges designers to rethink their roles as agents of deep structural change, understanding and manipulating “bifurcation parameters” across various scales, from products to policies. The interview, conducted in Italian by Salvina Elisa Cutuli from “Italia Che Cambia” and supported by Prof. Salvatore Di Dio, the conference’s scientific director, was presented to the Urban Thinkers Campus attendees on September 22nd, 2023.

Di Dio, S. (2024). Bifurcation by design : CSX Urban Thinkers Campus. In S. Di Dio (a cura di), Communities' Sustainable eXperiences (pp. 13-15). Altralinea.

Bifurcation by design : CSX Urban Thinkers Campus

Di Dio, Salvatore
2024-01-01

Abstract

The “Communities’ Sustainable eXperiences - Urban Thinkers Campus” opened with an interview featuring Emeritus Professor Federico Maria Butera discussing his book “Sole, Vento, and Acqua” (Manifestolibri, 2023). Butera emphasizes that transitioning to renewable energy requires more than just replacing fossil fuels; it demands a fundamental shift in our economic and cultural frameworks toward a circular economy. He characterizes the global predicament as needing a profound “bifurcation” in our approach to sustainable development, drawing on a concept from dynamical systems where small changes in parameters lead to significant shifts in behavior. The interview addresses the challenges of regions like Madonie, facing depopulation and limited services, and suggests that sustainable practices can rejuvenate such areas. Butera advocates for a comprehensive strategy combining sustainable agriculture, innovative waste management, and fostering urban-rural synergies. This approach emphasizes local production and consumption, reducing environmental impact and strengthening community bonds. Butera highlights the critical role of local authorities in supporting policies that promote direct trade, repair, reuse, and small-scale production. He stresses the need to adjust consumption patterns and focus on sustainability, particularly among the youth. He encourages young people to be informed, critically evaluate information, and actively engage in their communities for sustainable change. The discussion underscores the link between environmental sustainability, societal welfare, and political action, emphasizing collaborative efforts to achieve a sustainable and equitable world. Butera’s closing thoughts highlight the necessity of proactive and thoughtful design to avoid social and environmental disasters. This aligns with Terry Irwin’s “transition design” framework, advocating for systemic change rather than incremental shifts. Butera's emphasis on “bifurcation” encourages designers to identify and influence critical crossroads within societal systems, enabling substantial changes toward sustainability. This approach challenges designers to rethink their roles as agents of deep structural change, understanding and manipulating “bifurcation parameters” across various scales, from products to policies. The interview, conducted in Italian by Salvina Elisa Cutuli from “Italia Che Cambia” and supported by Prof. Salvatore Di Dio, the conference’s scientific director, was presented to the Urban Thinkers Campus attendees on September 22nd, 2023.
2024
Settore ICAR/13 - Disegno Industriale
Di Dio, S. (2024). Bifurcation by design : CSX Urban Thinkers Campus. In S. Di Dio (a cura di), Communities' Sustainable eXperiences (pp. 13-15). Altralinea.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
BIFURCATION BY DESIGN.pdf

Solo gestori archvio

Tipologia: Post-print
Dimensione 460.41 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
460.41 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/640683
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact