Compost can enhance the soil's ability to retain water, resulting in an overall improvement of soil physical quality (SPQ). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temporal variability of physical and hydraulic properties of a sandy loam soil amended with a compost obtained from orange juice processing wastes and garden cleaning. The soil water retention curve of repacked soil samples at varying compost to soil ratios, r, was determined at the time of compost embedding (M0) and after six months (M6), and twelve months (M12). Indicators of SPQ linked to soil water retention curve such as air capacity (AC), macroporosity (Pmac), plant available water capacity (PAWC), relative field capacity (RFC) and Dexter S-index (S), were estimated. The effect of compost addiction of the pore volume distribution function was also evaluated. The elapsed time from compost application influenced all SPQ indicators but the maximum beneficial effects of compost amendment were achieved within approximately the first six months. Indicators linked the macro- and mesoporosity (Pmac and AC) decreased with r whereas indicators linked to plant water availability (PAWC and RFC) increased with r. The combined effect of time and rate was statistically observed only for Pmac, PAWC and S. Compost addiction reduced the soil compaction and modified the pore system, as the fraction of structural porosity (i.e., macropores) decreased and the fraction of textural porosity (i.e., micropores) increased. It was concluded that even a single application of compost could have a significant impact on soil water retention and microstructure with positive implications for soil health, precision agriculture and crop productivity.

Bondi', C., Castellini, M., Iovino, M. (2024). Temporal variability of physical quality of a sandy loam soil amended with compost. BIOLOGIA [10.1007/s11756-024-01637-1].

Temporal variability of physical quality of a sandy loam soil amended with compost

Bondi', Cristina
;
Castellini, Mirko;Iovino, Massimo
2024-03-01

Abstract

Compost can enhance the soil's ability to retain water, resulting in an overall improvement of soil physical quality (SPQ). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temporal variability of physical and hydraulic properties of a sandy loam soil amended with a compost obtained from orange juice processing wastes and garden cleaning. The soil water retention curve of repacked soil samples at varying compost to soil ratios, r, was determined at the time of compost embedding (M0) and after six months (M6), and twelve months (M12). Indicators of SPQ linked to soil water retention curve such as air capacity (AC), macroporosity (Pmac), plant available water capacity (PAWC), relative field capacity (RFC) and Dexter S-index (S), were estimated. The effect of compost addiction of the pore volume distribution function was also evaluated. The elapsed time from compost application influenced all SPQ indicators but the maximum beneficial effects of compost amendment were achieved within approximately the first six months. Indicators linked the macro- and mesoporosity (Pmac and AC) decreased with r whereas indicators linked to plant water availability (PAWC and RFC) increased with r. The combined effect of time and rate was statistically observed only for Pmac, PAWC and S. Compost addiction reduced the soil compaction and modified the pore system, as the fraction of structural porosity (i.e., macropores) decreased and the fraction of textural porosity (i.e., micropores) increased. It was concluded that even a single application of compost could have a significant impact on soil water retention and microstructure with positive implications for soil health, precision agriculture and crop productivity.
1-mar-2024
Bondi', C., Castellini, M., Iovino, M. (2024). Temporal variability of physical quality of a sandy loam soil amended with compost. BIOLOGIA [10.1007/s11756-024-01637-1].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/638622
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