Large-vessel vasculitis (LVV) are autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases focused on vascular inflammation. The central core of the intricate immunological and molecular network resides in the disruption of the "privileged immune state" of the arterial wall. The outbreak, initially primed by dendritic cells (DC), is then continuously powered in a feed-forward loop by the intimate cooperation between innate and adaptive immunity. If the role of adaptive immunity has been largely elucidated, knowledge of the critical function of innate immunity in LVV is still fragile. A growing body of evidence has strengthened the active role of innate immunity players and their key signaling pathways in orchestrating the complex pathomechanisms underlying LVV. Besides DC, macrophages are crucial culprits in LVV development and participate across all phases of vascular inflammation, culminating in vessel wall remodeling. In recent years, the variety of potential pathogenic actors has expanded to include neutrophils, mast cells, and soluble mediators, including the complement system. Interestingly, new insights have recently linked the inflammasome to vascular inflammation, paving the way for its potential pathogenic role in LVV. Overall, these observations encourage a new conceptual approach that includes a more in-depth study of innate immunity pathways in LVV to guide future targeted therapies.

La Barbera, L., Rizzo, C., Camarda, F., Miceli, G., Tuttolomondo, A., Guggino, G. (2024). The Contribution of Innate Immunity in Large-Vessel Vasculitis: Detangling New Pathomechanisms beyond the Onset of Vascular Inflammation. CELLS, 13(3) [10.3390/cells13030271].

The Contribution of Innate Immunity in Large-Vessel Vasculitis: Detangling New Pathomechanisms beyond the Onset of Vascular Inflammation

La Barbera, Lidia;Rizzo, Chiara;Camarda, Federica;Miceli, Giuseppe;Tuttolomondo, Antonino;Guggino, Giuliana
2024-02-01

Abstract

Large-vessel vasculitis (LVV) are autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases focused on vascular inflammation. The central core of the intricate immunological and molecular network resides in the disruption of the "privileged immune state" of the arterial wall. The outbreak, initially primed by dendritic cells (DC), is then continuously powered in a feed-forward loop by the intimate cooperation between innate and adaptive immunity. If the role of adaptive immunity has been largely elucidated, knowledge of the critical function of innate immunity in LVV is still fragile. A growing body of evidence has strengthened the active role of innate immunity players and their key signaling pathways in orchestrating the complex pathomechanisms underlying LVV. Besides DC, macrophages are crucial culprits in LVV development and participate across all phases of vascular inflammation, culminating in vessel wall remodeling. In recent years, the variety of potential pathogenic actors has expanded to include neutrophils, mast cells, and soluble mediators, including the complement system. Interestingly, new insights have recently linked the inflammasome to vascular inflammation, paving the way for its potential pathogenic role in LVV. Overall, these observations encourage a new conceptual approach that includes a more in-depth study of innate immunity pathways in LVV to guide future targeted therapies.
1-feb-2024
La Barbera, L., Rizzo, C., Camarda, F., Miceli, G., Tuttolomondo, A., Guggino, G. (2024). The Contribution of Innate Immunity in Large-Vessel Vasculitis: Detangling New Pathomechanisms beyond the Onset of Vascular Inflammation. CELLS, 13(3) [10.3390/cells13030271].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/638394
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