BackgroundStreptococcus pneumoniae infections, including Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases (IPDs), pose a substantial public health challenge, causing significant morbidity and mortality, especially among children and older adults. Vaccination campaigns have played a vital role in reducing pneumococcal-related deaths. However, obstacles related to accessibility and awareness might impede optimal vaccine adoption. This study aims to provide comprehensive data on pneumococcal vaccine coverage and attitudes within at-risk groups in Italy, with the goal of informing public health strategies and addressing vaccination barriers.MethodsBetween April 11 and May 29, 2022, a questionnaire investigating vaccine uptake and attitudes toward several vaccinations was administered to 10,000 Italian adults, chosen through population-based sampling. Respondents who were targets of the campaign according to the 2017-2019 National Vaccination Plan, accessed questions regarding pneumococcal vaccination. Data on uptake, awareness of having the right to free vaccination, opinion on vaccine safety, concern with pneumococcal disease, and ease of access to vaccination services were summarized and presented based on statistical regions. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to explore factors influencing vaccine uptake.ResultsOut of 2357 eligible adult respondents (42.6% women; mean age: 58.1 +/- 15.7), 39.5% received pneumococcal vaccination. Uptake differed among at-risk groups: respondents aged >= 65 (33.7%), with lung disease (48.4%), cardiovascular disease (46.6%), and diabetes (53.7%). Predictors of not being vaccinated and unwilling to included female gender, residing in rural areas, lower education, low concern about pneumococcal disease, vaccine safety concerns, and associations with vaccine-opposed acquaintances. Health access issues predicted willingness to be vaccinated despite non-vaccination. Pneumopathy, heart disease, diabetes, and living in Northeastern or Central Italy were linked to higher uptake. Among the 1064 parents of eligible children, uptake was 79.1%. Parental unawareness of children's free vaccination eligibility was a predictor of non-vaccination. Vaccine safety concerns correlated with reluctance to vaccinate children, while perceived healthcare access challenges were associated with wanting but not having received vaccination.ConclusionsPneumococcal vaccination uptake within prioritized groups and children in Italy remains inadequate. Scarce awareness of vaccine availability and obstacles in accessing vaccinations emerge as principal barriers influencing this scenario.

Di Valerio, Z., La Fauci, G., Scognamiglio, F., Salussolia, A., Montalti, M., Capodici, A., et al. (2024). Pneumococcal vaccine uptake among high-risk adults and children in Italy: results from the OBVIOUS project survey. BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 24(1) [10.1186/s12889-024-18216-3].

Pneumococcal vaccine uptake among high-risk adults and children in Italy: results from the OBVIOUS project survey

Costantino, Claudio;
2024-03-07

Abstract

BackgroundStreptococcus pneumoniae infections, including Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases (IPDs), pose a substantial public health challenge, causing significant morbidity and mortality, especially among children and older adults. Vaccination campaigns have played a vital role in reducing pneumococcal-related deaths. However, obstacles related to accessibility and awareness might impede optimal vaccine adoption. This study aims to provide comprehensive data on pneumococcal vaccine coverage and attitudes within at-risk groups in Italy, with the goal of informing public health strategies and addressing vaccination barriers.MethodsBetween April 11 and May 29, 2022, a questionnaire investigating vaccine uptake and attitudes toward several vaccinations was administered to 10,000 Italian adults, chosen through population-based sampling. Respondents who were targets of the campaign according to the 2017-2019 National Vaccination Plan, accessed questions regarding pneumococcal vaccination. Data on uptake, awareness of having the right to free vaccination, opinion on vaccine safety, concern with pneumococcal disease, and ease of access to vaccination services were summarized and presented based on statistical regions. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to explore factors influencing vaccine uptake.ResultsOut of 2357 eligible adult respondents (42.6% women; mean age: 58.1 +/- 15.7), 39.5% received pneumococcal vaccination. Uptake differed among at-risk groups: respondents aged >= 65 (33.7%), with lung disease (48.4%), cardiovascular disease (46.6%), and diabetes (53.7%). Predictors of not being vaccinated and unwilling to included female gender, residing in rural areas, lower education, low concern about pneumococcal disease, vaccine safety concerns, and associations with vaccine-opposed acquaintances. Health access issues predicted willingness to be vaccinated despite non-vaccination. Pneumopathy, heart disease, diabetes, and living in Northeastern or Central Italy were linked to higher uptake. Among the 1064 parents of eligible children, uptake was 79.1%. Parental unawareness of children's free vaccination eligibility was a predictor of non-vaccination. Vaccine safety concerns correlated with reluctance to vaccinate children, while perceived healthcare access challenges were associated with wanting but not having received vaccination.ConclusionsPneumococcal vaccination uptake within prioritized groups and children in Italy remains inadequate. Scarce awareness of vaccine availability and obstacles in accessing vaccinations emerge as principal barriers influencing this scenario.
7-mar-2024
Di Valerio, Z., La Fauci, G., Scognamiglio, F., Salussolia, A., Montalti, M., Capodici, A., et al. (2024). Pneumococcal vaccine uptake among high-risk adults and children in Italy: results from the OBVIOUS project survey. BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 24(1) [10.1186/s12889-024-18216-3].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/638187
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