Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is a key healthcare challenge facing all aging Western societies, second only to Alzheimer's Disease (AD) as a cause of dementia [1]. Initial concepts of VCI invoked cortical or subcortical infarction – leading to the terms “multi-infarct dementia” and “post-stroke dementia”. However subcortical small vessel disease (often not causing acute or overt clinical symptoms) also plays a critical role in VCI [2–4]. MRI is the most important tool for detecting and quantifying small vessel diseases, and forms part of current diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia [1]. MRI manifestations of small vessel diseases including white matter hyperintensities (WMH: bright signal areas on T2-weighted or FLAIR images including leukoaraiosis) and lacunes have been recognized for many years. Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) – small, perviascular haemorrhages seen as well-demarcated, rounded lesions on MRI sequences sensitive to magnetic susceptibility – are also now recognized as a manifestation of small vessel pathology [5] (Fig. 1), but their clinical impact on cognition remains uncertain [6]. This review will consider how CMBs may be relevant in the study of VCI.

Werring, D.J., Gregoire, S.M., Cipolotti, L. (2010). Cerebral microbleeds and vascular cognitive impairment. JOURNAL OF THE NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES, 299(1-2), 131-135 [10.1016/j.jns.2010.08.034].

Cerebral microbleeds and vascular cognitive impairment

CIPOLOTTI, Lisa
2010-01-01

Abstract

Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is a key healthcare challenge facing all aging Western societies, second only to Alzheimer's Disease (AD) as a cause of dementia [1]. Initial concepts of VCI invoked cortical or subcortical infarction – leading to the terms “multi-infarct dementia” and “post-stroke dementia”. However subcortical small vessel disease (often not causing acute or overt clinical symptoms) also plays a critical role in VCI [2–4]. MRI is the most important tool for detecting and quantifying small vessel diseases, and forms part of current diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia [1]. MRI manifestations of small vessel diseases including white matter hyperintensities (WMH: bright signal areas on T2-weighted or FLAIR images including leukoaraiosis) and lacunes have been recognized for many years. Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) – small, perviascular haemorrhages seen as well-demarcated, rounded lesions on MRI sequences sensitive to magnetic susceptibility – are also now recognized as a manifestation of small vessel pathology [5] (Fig. 1), but their clinical impact on cognition remains uncertain [6]. This review will consider how CMBs may be relevant in the study of VCI.
2010
Werring, D.J., Gregoire, S.M., Cipolotti, L. (2010). Cerebral microbleeds and vascular cognitive impairment. JOURNAL OF THE NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES, 299(1-2), 131-135 [10.1016/j.jns.2010.08.034].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/62505
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