Background and aim: Metabolic dysfunctions, particularly hyperlipidemia, are a common finding in Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC). In presence of metabolic components of fatty-liver-disease (MAFLD), the liver fibrosis progression risk is higher. The aim of this study was to evaluate lifestyle of PBC patients compared to controls. Methods: In a prospective, multicenter study 107 PBC patients were enrolled; among these, 54 subjects were age-and sex-matched with 54 controls with a propensity-score-matching-analysis. Eating habits and physical activity were evaluated, respectively, with a food-frequency-questionnaire and with a short pre-validated-questionnaire. The adherence to Mediterranean diet was assessed with the alternate Mediterranean diet score. Results: The total fat intake was higher in controls than in PBC (p=0.004), unless above the national recommendations in both groups. Moreover, in PBC monounsaturated-fat and polyunsaturated-fatty-acid intakes and the adherence to Mediterranean diet were significantly lower than in controls (p<0.001, p=0.005 and p<0.001 respectively). Regarding physical activity, PBC subjects had a sedentary behavior as well as controls. Conclusions: The lifestyle of both PBC and controls is at high risk of developing MAFLD. Therefore, hepatologists should regularly evaluate eating habits and physical activity in PBC patients and promote a lifestyle change to reduce liver disease progression risk.

Cossiga, V., Cazzagon, N., Montalti, R., Ciminnisi, S., Attanasio, M.R., Pezzato, F., et al. (2023). The unhealthy lifestyle in primary biliary cholangitis: An enemy to fight. DIGESTIVE AND LIVER DISEASE, 55(6), 778-784 [10.1016/j.dld.2022.12.009].

The unhealthy lifestyle in primary biliary cholangitis: An enemy to fight

Ciminnisi, Stefania;Giacchetto, Marco;Calvaruso, Vincenza;
2023-06-01

Abstract

Background and aim: Metabolic dysfunctions, particularly hyperlipidemia, are a common finding in Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC). In presence of metabolic components of fatty-liver-disease (MAFLD), the liver fibrosis progression risk is higher. The aim of this study was to evaluate lifestyle of PBC patients compared to controls. Methods: In a prospective, multicenter study 107 PBC patients were enrolled; among these, 54 subjects were age-and sex-matched with 54 controls with a propensity-score-matching-analysis. Eating habits and physical activity were evaluated, respectively, with a food-frequency-questionnaire and with a short pre-validated-questionnaire. The adherence to Mediterranean diet was assessed with the alternate Mediterranean diet score. Results: The total fat intake was higher in controls than in PBC (p=0.004), unless above the national recommendations in both groups. Moreover, in PBC monounsaturated-fat and polyunsaturated-fatty-acid intakes and the adherence to Mediterranean diet were significantly lower than in controls (p<0.001, p=0.005 and p<0.001 respectively). Regarding physical activity, PBC subjects had a sedentary behavior as well as controls. Conclusions: The lifestyle of both PBC and controls is at high risk of developing MAFLD. Therefore, hepatologists should regularly evaluate eating habits and physical activity in PBC patients and promote a lifestyle change to reduce liver disease progression risk.
giu-2023
Cossiga, V., Cazzagon, N., Montalti, R., Ciminnisi, S., Attanasio, M.R., Pezzato, F., et al. (2023). The unhealthy lifestyle in primary biliary cholangitis: An enemy to fight. DIGESTIVE AND LIVER DISEASE, 55(6), 778-784 [10.1016/j.dld.2022.12.009].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/620602
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