Background: Malaria during pregnancy is associated with a greater risk of complications for the mother and fetus. The aim of the study is to analyze the features of imported cases of malaria in pregnant women in Europe and evaluate which factors are associated with a non-favourable outcome. Methods: A computerized search of the literature was performed combining the terms plasmod*, malaria, pregnan*, maternal, gravid, parturient, expectant, and congenital, from January 1997 to July 2023. Results: 28 articles reporting 57 cases of malaria in pregnant women immigrant in non-endemic areas were included. The patients mainly came from Sub-Saharan Africa. There were 10 asymptomatic cases, while the predominant clinical syndrome among the symptomatic women was fever associated with anaemia. The median latency period from permanence in endemic areas and diagnosis in European countries was 180 days (IQR 15-730). Pregnancy outcomes were favourable in 35 cases (61 %): all term pregnancies, no low-birth-weight newborns. There were 4 abortions; 1 child was delivered pre-term; 7 babies were reported to have a low birth weight; 10 cases of congenital malaria were documented. P. falciparum was found with a higher frequency in women with a favourable outcome, while P. vivax was, in all cases, associated with a worse prognosis. Conclusions: Diagnosis of malaria in pregnant woman in non-endemic countries may be challenging and a delay in diagnosis may lead to an adverse outcome. Screening for malaria should be performed in pregnant women from endemic areas, especially if they present anaemia or fever.

Guida Marascia, F., Colomba, C., Abbott, M., Gizzi, A., Anastasia, A., Pipitò, L., et al. (2023). Imported malaria in pregnancy in Europe: A systematic review of the literature of the last 25 years [10.1016/j.tmaid.2023.102673].

Imported malaria in pregnancy in Europe: A systematic review of the literature of the last 25 years

Guida Marascia, Federica
Primo
;
Colomba, Claudia;Abbott, Michelle;Gizzi, Andrea;Anastasia, Antonio;Cascio, Antonio
Ultimo
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background: Malaria during pregnancy is associated with a greater risk of complications for the mother and fetus. The aim of the study is to analyze the features of imported cases of malaria in pregnant women in Europe and evaluate which factors are associated with a non-favourable outcome. Methods: A computerized search of the literature was performed combining the terms plasmod*, malaria, pregnan*, maternal, gravid, parturient, expectant, and congenital, from January 1997 to July 2023. Results: 28 articles reporting 57 cases of malaria in pregnant women immigrant in non-endemic areas were included. The patients mainly came from Sub-Saharan Africa. There were 10 asymptomatic cases, while the predominant clinical syndrome among the symptomatic women was fever associated with anaemia. The median latency period from permanence in endemic areas and diagnosis in European countries was 180 days (IQR 15-730). Pregnancy outcomes were favourable in 35 cases (61 %): all term pregnancies, no low-birth-weight newborns. There were 4 abortions; 1 child was delivered pre-term; 7 babies were reported to have a low birth weight; 10 cases of congenital malaria were documented. P. falciparum was found with a higher frequency in women with a favourable outcome, while P. vivax was, in all cases, associated with a worse prognosis. Conclusions: Diagnosis of malaria in pregnant woman in non-endemic countries may be challenging and a delay in diagnosis may lead to an adverse outcome. Screening for malaria should be performed in pregnant women from endemic areas, especially if they present anaemia or fever.
2023
Guida Marascia, F., Colomba, C., Abbott, M., Gizzi, A., Anastasia, A., Pipitò, L., et al. (2023). Imported malaria in pregnancy in Europe: A systematic review of the literature of the last 25 years [10.1016/j.tmaid.2023.102673].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/620393
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