Background The availability of molecular techniques has significantly increased our understanding of bacteria of the order Rickettsiales, allowing the identification of distinct species in both vector and host arthropods. However, the literature lacks studies that comprehensively summarize the vast amount of knowledge generated on this topic in recent years. The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the distribution of Rickettsiales in arthropod vectors, animals and humans in the WHO European Region in order to provide useful information to predict the emergence of certain diseases in specific geographical areas and to formulate hypotheses regarding the possible pathogenetic role of some rickettsial species in the etiology of human pathological conditions.Methods A systematic review of the literature in the PubMed and EMBASE databases was conducted following the PRISMA methodology using the search terms "Spotted fever " OR "rickettsiosis " OR "ricketts* " AND all the countries of the WHO European Region, from 1 January 2013 to 12 February 2022. Only studies that identified rickettsiae in human, animal or arthropod samples using molecular techniques were included in the review.Results A total of 467 articles considering 61 different species of Rickettsiales with confirmed or suspected human pathogenicity were analyzed in the review. More than 566 identifications of Rickettsiales DNA in human samples were described, of which 89 cases were assessed as importation cases. A total of 55 species of ticks, 17 species of fleas, 10 species of mite and four species of lice were found infected. Twenty-three species of Rickettsiales were detected in wild and domestic animal samples.Conclusion The routine use of molecular methods to search for Rickettsiales DNA in questing ticks and other blood-sucking arthropods that commonly bite humans should be encouraged. Molecular methods specific for Rickettsiales should be used routinely in the diagnostics of fever of unknown origin and in all cases of human diseases secondary to an arthropod bite or animal contact.

Guccione, C., Colomba, C., Iaria, C., Cascio, A. (2023). Rickettsiales in the WHO European Region: an update from a One Health perspective. PARASITES & VECTORS, 16(1), 41 [10.1186/s13071-022-05646-4].

Rickettsiales in the WHO European Region: an update from a One Health perspective

Colomba, Claudia;Cascio, Antonio
2023-01-30

Abstract

Background The availability of molecular techniques has significantly increased our understanding of bacteria of the order Rickettsiales, allowing the identification of distinct species in both vector and host arthropods. However, the literature lacks studies that comprehensively summarize the vast amount of knowledge generated on this topic in recent years. The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the distribution of Rickettsiales in arthropod vectors, animals and humans in the WHO European Region in order to provide useful information to predict the emergence of certain diseases in specific geographical areas and to formulate hypotheses regarding the possible pathogenetic role of some rickettsial species in the etiology of human pathological conditions.Methods A systematic review of the literature in the PubMed and EMBASE databases was conducted following the PRISMA methodology using the search terms "Spotted fever " OR "rickettsiosis " OR "ricketts* " AND all the countries of the WHO European Region, from 1 January 2013 to 12 February 2022. Only studies that identified rickettsiae in human, animal or arthropod samples using molecular techniques were included in the review.Results A total of 467 articles considering 61 different species of Rickettsiales with confirmed or suspected human pathogenicity were analyzed in the review. More than 566 identifications of Rickettsiales DNA in human samples were described, of which 89 cases were assessed as importation cases. A total of 55 species of ticks, 17 species of fleas, 10 species of mite and four species of lice were found infected. Twenty-three species of Rickettsiales were detected in wild and domestic animal samples.Conclusion The routine use of molecular methods to search for Rickettsiales DNA in questing ticks and other blood-sucking arthropods that commonly bite humans should be encouraged. Molecular methods specific for Rickettsiales should be used routinely in the diagnostics of fever of unknown origin and in all cases of human diseases secondary to an arthropod bite or animal contact.
30-gen-2023
Guccione, C., Colomba, C., Iaria, C., Cascio, A. (2023). Rickettsiales in the WHO European Region: an update from a One Health perspective. PARASITES & VECTORS, 16(1), 41 [10.1186/s13071-022-05646-4].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/620298
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