Splenic flexure (SFM) in rectal cancer surgery is a crucial step which may increase the difficulty of the operation. The aim of this retrospective single-center study is to demonstrate if the selective omission of SFM during anterior rectal resection can reduce the complexity of the operation, without affecting post-operative and oncologic outcomes. Data of 112 consecutive rectal resections for cancer from March 2010 to March 2017 were analyzed and divided into two groups: SFM and No-SFM. A sub-analysis was then performed for laparoscopy and traditional cases. Post-operative and oncologic outcomes, including overall (OS) and cancer-related survival (CRS), were analyzed and compared. SFM was performed in 42% of cases and laparoscopy was used in 73.2%. Operative time resulted significantly lower in the No-SFM group (190 vs. 225 min, p = 0.01). In laparoscopy in the No-SFM group, operative time and post-operative stay were significantly lower (205.5 vs. 222.5 min, p = 0.04; 9 vs. 10 days, p = 0.01). Most of the open resections were performed without SFM (35.4% vs. 14.9%, p = 0.02). No statistical significant differences were found in OS and CRS in the two groups. We support the hypothesis that every surgeon should carry out an accurate intra-operative evaluation to perform a selective SFM. When possible, SFM can be safely avoided with no additional risks in terms of post-operative and oncologic outcomes.

Ferrara F., Di Gioia G., Gentile D., Carrara G., Gobatti D., Stella M. (2018). Splenic flexure mobilization in rectal cancer surgery: do we always need it?. UPDATES IN SURGERY, 71(3), 505-513 [10.1007/s13304-018-0603-8].

Splenic flexure mobilization in rectal cancer surgery: do we always need it?

Ferrara F.
;
2018-11-08

Abstract

Splenic flexure (SFM) in rectal cancer surgery is a crucial step which may increase the difficulty of the operation. The aim of this retrospective single-center study is to demonstrate if the selective omission of SFM during anterior rectal resection can reduce the complexity of the operation, without affecting post-operative and oncologic outcomes. Data of 112 consecutive rectal resections for cancer from March 2010 to March 2017 were analyzed and divided into two groups: SFM and No-SFM. A sub-analysis was then performed for laparoscopy and traditional cases. Post-operative and oncologic outcomes, including overall (OS) and cancer-related survival (CRS), were analyzed and compared. SFM was performed in 42% of cases and laparoscopy was used in 73.2%. Operative time resulted significantly lower in the No-SFM group (190 vs. 225 min, p = 0.01). In laparoscopy in the No-SFM group, operative time and post-operative stay were significantly lower (205.5 vs. 222.5 min, p = 0.04; 9 vs. 10 days, p = 0.01). Most of the open resections were performed without SFM (35.4% vs. 14.9%, p = 0.02). No statistical significant differences were found in OS and CRS in the two groups. We support the hypothesis that every surgeon should carry out an accurate intra-operative evaluation to perform a selective SFM. When possible, SFM can be safely avoided with no additional risks in terms of post-operative and oncologic outcomes.
8-nov-2018
Ferrara F., Di Gioia G., Gentile D., Carrara G., Gobatti D., Stella M. (2018). Splenic flexure mobilization in rectal cancer surgery: do we always need it?. UPDATES IN SURGERY, 71(3), 505-513 [10.1007/s13304-018-0603-8].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/609850
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