Urothelial carcinoma (UC), the sixth most common cancer in Western countries, includes upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) and bladder carcinoma (BC) as the most common cancers among UCs (90-95%). BC is the most common cancer and can be a highly heterogeneous disease, including both non-muscle-invasive (NMIBC) and muscle-invasive (MIBC) forms with different oncologic outcomes. Approximately 80% of new BC diagnoses are classified as NMIBC after the initial transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBt). In this setting, intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is the current standard treatment for intermediate- and high-risk patients. Unfortunately, recurrence occurs in 30% to 40% of patients despite adequate BCG treatment. Radical cystectomy (RC) is currently considered the standard treatment for NMIBC that does not respond to BCG. However, RC is a complex surgical procedure with a recognized high perioperative morbidity that is dependent on the patient, disease behaviors, and surgical factors and is associated with a significant impact on quality of life. Therefore, there is an unmet clinical need for alternative bladder-preserving treatments for patients who desire a bladder-sparing approach or are too frail for major surgery. In this review, we aim to present the strategies in BCG-unresponsive NMIBC, focusing on novel molecular therapeutic targets.

Claps F., Pavan N., Ongaro L., Tierno D., Grassi G., Trombetta C., et al. (2023). BCG-Unresponsive Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Current Treatment Landscape and Novel Emerging Molecular Targets. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES, 24(16) [10.3390/ijms241612596].

BCG-Unresponsive Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Current Treatment Landscape and Novel Emerging Molecular Targets

Pavan N.;Tulone G.;Simonato A.;
2023-08-09

Abstract

Urothelial carcinoma (UC), the sixth most common cancer in Western countries, includes upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) and bladder carcinoma (BC) as the most common cancers among UCs (90-95%). BC is the most common cancer and can be a highly heterogeneous disease, including both non-muscle-invasive (NMIBC) and muscle-invasive (MIBC) forms with different oncologic outcomes. Approximately 80% of new BC diagnoses are classified as NMIBC after the initial transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBt). In this setting, intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is the current standard treatment for intermediate- and high-risk patients. Unfortunately, recurrence occurs in 30% to 40% of patients despite adequate BCG treatment. Radical cystectomy (RC) is currently considered the standard treatment for NMIBC that does not respond to BCG. However, RC is a complex surgical procedure with a recognized high perioperative morbidity that is dependent on the patient, disease behaviors, and surgical factors and is associated with a significant impact on quality of life. Therefore, there is an unmet clinical need for alternative bladder-preserving treatments for patients who desire a bladder-sparing approach or are too frail for major surgery. In this review, we aim to present the strategies in BCG-unresponsive NMIBC, focusing on novel molecular therapeutic targets.
9-ago-2023
Claps F., Pavan N., Ongaro L., Tierno D., Grassi G., Trombetta C., et al. (2023). BCG-Unresponsive Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Current Treatment Landscape and Novel Emerging Molecular Targets. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES, 24(16) [10.3390/ijms241612596].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/608273
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