Planktonic calcifying organisms play a key role in regulating ocean carbonate chemistry and atmospheric CO 2 . Surprisingly, references to the absolute and relative contribution of these organisms to calcium carbonate production are lacking. Here we report quantification of pelagic calcium carbonate produc- tion in the North Pacific, providing new insights on the contribution of the three main planktonic calcifying groups. Our results show that coccolitho- phores dominate the living calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) standing stock, with coccolithophore calcite comprising ~90% of total CaCO 3 production, and pteropods and foraminifera playing a secondary role. We show that pelagic CaCO 3 production is higher than the sinking flux of CaCO 3 at 150 and 200 m at ocean stations ALOHA and PAPA, implying that a large portion of pelagic calcium carbonate is remineralised within the photic zone; this extensive shallow dissolution explains the apparent discrepancy between previous estimates of CaCO 3 production derived from satellite observations/biogeo- chemical modeling versus estimates from shallow sediment traps. We suggest future changes in the CaCO 3 cycle and its impact on atmospheric CO 2 will largely depend on how the poorly-understood processes that determine whether CaCO 3 is remineralised in the photic zone or exported to depth respond to anthropogenic warming and acidification.

Ziveri P, Gray WR, Anglada-Ortiz G, Manno C, Grelaud M, Incarbona A, et al. (2023). Pelagic calcium carbonate production and shallow dissolution in the North Pacific Ocean. NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 1-14 [10.1038/s41467-023-36177-w].

Pelagic calcium carbonate production and shallow dissolution in the North Pacific Ocean

Incarbona A;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Planktonic calcifying organisms play a key role in regulating ocean carbonate chemistry and atmospheric CO 2 . Surprisingly, references to the absolute and relative contribution of these organisms to calcium carbonate production are lacking. Here we report quantification of pelagic calcium carbonate produc- tion in the North Pacific, providing new insights on the contribution of the three main planktonic calcifying groups. Our results show that coccolitho- phores dominate the living calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) standing stock, with coccolithophore calcite comprising ~90% of total CaCO 3 production, and pteropods and foraminifera playing a secondary role. We show that pelagic CaCO 3 production is higher than the sinking flux of CaCO 3 at 150 and 200 m at ocean stations ALOHA and PAPA, implying that a large portion of pelagic calcium carbonate is remineralised within the photic zone; this extensive shallow dissolution explains the apparent discrepancy between previous estimates of CaCO 3 production derived from satellite observations/biogeo- chemical modeling versus estimates from shallow sediment traps. We suggest future changes in the CaCO 3 cycle and its impact on atmospheric CO 2 will largely depend on how the poorly-understood processes that determine whether CaCO 3 is remineralised in the photic zone or exported to depth respond to anthropogenic warming and acidification.
2023
Settore GEO/01 - Paleontologia E Paleoecologia
Ziveri P, Gray WR, Anglada-Ortiz G, Manno C, Grelaud M, Incarbona A, et al. (2023). Pelagic calcium carbonate production and shallow dissolution in the North Pacific Ocean. NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 1-14 [10.1038/s41467-023-36177-w].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/583254
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