Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a highly contagious seasonal virus and the leading cause of Lower Respiratory Tract Infections (LRTI), including pneumonia and bronchiolitis in children. RSV-related LRTI cause approximately 3 million hospitalizations and 120,000 deaths annually among children <5 years of age. The majority of the burden of RSV occurs in previously healthy infants. Only a monoclonal antibody (mAb) has been approved against RSV infections in a restricted group, leaving an urgent unmet need for a large number of children potentially benefiting from preventive measures. Approaches under development include maternal vaccines to protect newborns, extended half-life monoclonal antibodies to provide rapid long-lasting protection, and pediatric vaccines. RSV has been identified as a major global priority but a solution to tackle this unmet need for all children has yet to be implemented. New technologies represent the avenue for effectively addressing the leading-cause of hospitalization in children <1 years old.

Baraldi E., Checcucci Lisi G., Costantino C., Heinrichs J.H., Manzoni P., Ricco M., et al. (2022). RSV disease in infants and young children: Can we see a brighter future?. HUMAN VACCINES & IMMUNOTHERAPEUTICS, 18(4) [10.1080/21645515.2022.2079322].

RSV disease in infants and young children: Can we see a brighter future?

Costantino C.;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a highly contagious seasonal virus and the leading cause of Lower Respiratory Tract Infections (LRTI), including pneumonia and bronchiolitis in children. RSV-related LRTI cause approximately 3 million hospitalizations and 120,000 deaths annually among children <5 years of age. The majority of the burden of RSV occurs in previously healthy infants. Only a monoclonal antibody (mAb) has been approved against RSV infections in a restricted group, leaving an urgent unmet need for a large number of children potentially benefiting from preventive measures. Approaches under development include maternal vaccines to protect newborns, extended half-life monoclonal antibodies to provide rapid long-lasting protection, and pediatric vaccines. RSV has been identified as a major global priority but a solution to tackle this unmet need for all children has yet to be implemented. New technologies represent the avenue for effectively addressing the leading-cause of hospitalization in children <1 years old.
Baraldi E., Checcucci Lisi G., Costantino C., Heinrichs J.H., Manzoni P., Ricco M., et al. (2022). RSV disease in infants and young children: Can we see a brighter future?. HUMAN VACCINES & IMMUNOTHERAPEUTICS, 18(4) [10.1080/21645515.2022.2079322].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/579423
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