The increasing industrial use of vanadium (V), as well as its recent medical use in various pathologies has intensified its environmental release, making it an emerging pollutant. The sea urchin embryo has long been used to study the effects induced by metals, including V. In this study we used an integrated approach that correlates the biological effects on embryo development with proteolytic activities of gelatinases that could better reflect any metal-induced imbalances. V-exposure caused morphological/morphometric aberrations, mainly concerning the correct distribution of embryonic cells, the development of the skeleton, and the embryo volume. Moreover, V induced a concentration change in all the gelatinases expressed during embryo development and a reduction in their total proteolytic activity. The presence of three MMP-like gelatinases (MMP-2, -9, and -14) was also demonstrated and their levels depended on V-concentration. In particular, the MMP-14-like protein modified its expression level during embryo development in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This enzyme also showed a specific localization on filopodia, suggesting that primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) could be responsible for its synthesis. In conclusion, these results indicate that an integrated study among morphology/morphometry, proteolytic activity, and MMP-14 expression constitutes an important response profile to V-action.

Chiarelli R., Martino C., Scudiero R., Geraci F. (2022). Vanadium Modulates Proteolytic Activities and MMP-14-Like Levels during Paracentrotus lividus Embryogenesis. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES, 23(22), 1-21 [10.3390/ijms232214238].

Vanadium Modulates Proteolytic Activities and MMP-14-Like Levels during Paracentrotus lividus Embryogenesis

Chiarelli R.
Primo
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Martino C.
Secondo
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Scudiero R.
Penultimo
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Geraci F.
Ultimo
Membro del Collaboration Group
2022-11-17

Abstract

The increasing industrial use of vanadium (V), as well as its recent medical use in various pathologies has intensified its environmental release, making it an emerging pollutant. The sea urchin embryo has long been used to study the effects induced by metals, including V. In this study we used an integrated approach that correlates the biological effects on embryo development with proteolytic activities of gelatinases that could better reflect any metal-induced imbalances. V-exposure caused morphological/morphometric aberrations, mainly concerning the correct distribution of embryonic cells, the development of the skeleton, and the embryo volume. Moreover, V induced a concentration change in all the gelatinases expressed during embryo development and a reduction in their total proteolytic activity. The presence of three MMP-like gelatinases (MMP-2, -9, and -14) was also demonstrated and their levels depended on V-concentration. In particular, the MMP-14-like protein modified its expression level during embryo development in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This enzyme also showed a specific localization on filopodia, suggesting that primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) could be responsible for its synthesis. In conclusion, these results indicate that an integrated study among morphology/morphometry, proteolytic activity, and MMP-14 expression constitutes an important response profile to V-action.
https://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/23/22/14238
Chiarelli R., Martino C., Scudiero R., Geraci F. (2022). Vanadium Modulates Proteolytic Activities and MMP-14-Like Levels during Paracentrotus lividus Embryogenesis. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES, 23(22), 1-21 [10.3390/ijms232214238].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/575888
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