‘Abd al-Haqq ibn Sab‘ı¯n was born in the Ricote Valley, near Cieza, in the Kingdom of Murcia sometimes between the year 613 and 614 of the Hegira (1216 or 1217 CE). He studied Arabic, Andalusi literature, logic and philosophy, medicine, alchemy, white magic, and the ‘‘Science of Names and Letters.’’ At that time Ibn Khala¯s: was the qadi of Ceuta. He chose Ibn Sab‘ın to answer the philosophical questions sent by the emperor Frederick II of Hohenstaufen. It has been contended that Ibn Sab‘ı¯n was forced to leave his new hometown after answering the emperor’s arguments. What seems more likely, however, is that his Sufi ideas were not very popular with the political chief of the town. The time spent in Maghreb was, nonetheless, lively and productive: Ibn Sab‘ı¯n wrote his most important works and many people shared his ideas. Ibn Sab‘ı¯n was instead rejected in Egypt: his mystical thoughts, based only on some obscure philosophical arguments, were difficult for the Egyptian audience to master. Ibn Sab‘ı¯n fled to Mecca and his settlement in this town lasted several years: in that place he finally found peace and rest. The majority of his biographers believe that Ibn Sab‘ı¯n died in 669 h. (1270 CE).

Patrizia Spallino (2011). Ibn Sab'in. In H. Lagerlund (a cura di), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy (pp. 507-514). Henrik Langerlund Editor, Springer (ed.) [10.1007/978-1-4020-9729-4].

Ibn Sab'in

Patrizia Spallino
2011

Abstract

‘Abd al-Haqq ibn Sab‘ı¯n was born in the Ricote Valley, near Cieza, in the Kingdom of Murcia sometimes between the year 613 and 614 of the Hegira (1216 or 1217 CE). He studied Arabic, Andalusi literature, logic and philosophy, medicine, alchemy, white magic, and the ‘‘Science of Names and Letters.’’ At that time Ibn Khala¯s: was the qadi of Ceuta. He chose Ibn Sab‘ın to answer the philosophical questions sent by the emperor Frederick II of Hohenstaufen. It has been contended that Ibn Sab‘ı¯n was forced to leave his new hometown after answering the emperor’s arguments. What seems more likely, however, is that his Sufi ideas were not very popular with the political chief of the town. The time spent in Maghreb was, nonetheless, lively and productive: Ibn Sab‘ı¯n wrote his most important works and many people shared his ideas. Ibn Sab‘ı¯n was instead rejected in Egypt: his mystical thoughts, based only on some obscure philosophical arguments, were difficult for the Egyptian audience to master. Ibn Sab‘ı¯n fled to Mecca and his settlement in this town lasted several years: in that place he finally found peace and rest. The majority of his biographers believe that Ibn Sab‘ı¯n died in 669 h. (1270 CE).
Abd al-Haqq Ibn Sab'in, sufism, islamic philosophy, Frederic II
Patrizia Spallino (2011). Ibn Sab'in. In H. Lagerlund (a cura di), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy (pp. 507-514). Henrik Langerlund Editor, Springer (ed.) [10.1007/978-1-4020-9729-4].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10447/567446
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