Abstract: Intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) is a useful technique in electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate the neurophysiological anomalies of brain activity. Although not an active task, IPS has also been explored in ASD; it is thought to capture local potential oscillators at specific frequencies and perhaps tap into rhythmic activity in a way that general resting-state recordings cannot. Previous studies suggest that individuals with ASD showed photic driving reactivity predominantly at lower frequencies of stimulation. In our study we used IPS to measure rhythmic oscillatory activity in a sample of 81 ASD children. We found a significant correlation linking ASD children with photic driving activation only at low frequencies ( band) and increased severity of “restricted behavior”. This suggests that ASD children with higher severity of restricted behaviors could have a hypersynchronous power and an impaired resonance synchronization at middle-ranged frequencies (). Furthermore, we found some evidence of hemispherical oscillatory asymmetry linked particularly to behavioral impairments. This result is in line with the EEG pattern model indicating a “U-shaped profile” of electrophysiological power alterations with excess power in lowand high-frequency bands and a reduction of power in the middle-ranged frequencies. IPS technique in electroencephalography is confirmed to reveal EEG biomarkers in autistic children, with a focus on spectral power, coherence, and hemisphere asymmetries.

Vetri, L., Maniscalco, L., Diana, P., Guidotti, M., Matranga, D., Bonnet-Brilhault, F., et al. (2022). A Preliminary Study on Photic Driving in the Electroencephalogram of Children with Autism across a Wide Cognitive and Behavioral Range. JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, 11(13) [10.3390/jcm11133568].

A Preliminary Study on Photic Driving in the Electroencephalogram of Children with Autism across a Wide Cognitive and Behavioral Range

Vetri, Luigi;Maniscalco, Laura;Diana, Paola;Matranga, Domenica
;
Tripi, Gabriele
2022

Abstract

Abstract: Intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) is a useful technique in electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate the neurophysiological anomalies of brain activity. Although not an active task, IPS has also been explored in ASD; it is thought to capture local potential oscillators at specific frequencies and perhaps tap into rhythmic activity in a way that general resting-state recordings cannot. Previous studies suggest that individuals with ASD showed photic driving reactivity predominantly at lower frequencies of stimulation. In our study we used IPS to measure rhythmic oscillatory activity in a sample of 81 ASD children. We found a significant correlation linking ASD children with photic driving activation only at low frequencies ( band) and increased severity of “restricted behavior”. This suggests that ASD children with higher severity of restricted behaviors could have a hypersynchronous power and an impaired resonance synchronization at middle-ranged frequencies (). Furthermore, we found some evidence of hemispherical oscillatory asymmetry linked particularly to behavioral impairments. This result is in line with the EEG pattern model indicating a “U-shaped profile” of electrophysiological power alterations with excess power in lowand high-frequency bands and a reduction of power in the middle-ranged frequencies. IPS technique in electroencephalography is confirmed to reveal EEG biomarkers in autistic children, with a focus on spectral power, coherence, and hemisphere asymmetries.
Settore MED/39 - Neuropsichiatria Infantile
Vetri, L., Maniscalco, L., Diana, P., Guidotti, M., Matranga, D., Bonnet-Brilhault, F., et al. (2022). A Preliminary Study on Photic Driving in the Electroencephalogram of Children with Autism across a Wide Cognitive and Behavioral Range. JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, 11(13) [10.3390/jcm11133568].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10447/562228
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