Background: Previous studies have suggested a relationship between ‘red ear syndrome’ (RES) and pediatric migraine. Aims of this study were (i) to assess the frequency, specificity and sensitivity of RES in a population of pediatric migraineurs and (ii) to establish the pathophysiological mechanisms of RES associated with migraine. Methods and results: A total of 226 children suffering from headache (aged 4–17 years) were enrolled. One hundred and seventy-two (76.4%) were affected by migraine, the remaining 54 (23.6%) by other primary headaches. RES was followed significantly more frequently by migraine (23.3%; p<.0001), and was characterized by high specificity and positive predictive value (96.3 and 95.3%, respectively). According to the univariate statistical analysis, RES showed a statistically significant association with male gender, throbbing quality of the pain, vomiting and phonophobia. It was confirmed by a multivariate stepwise logistic regression model only for the throbbing quality of the pain, vomiting and male gender. Conclusions: Our study showed that (i) in children, RES is a highly specific sign for migraine. In addition, the evidence of an association of RES with some migraine features partially provoked by the parasympathetic system supports the hypothesis of a shared pathophysiological background (e.g. via the activation of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex).

Raieli, V., Compagno, A., Brighina, F., La Franca, G., Puma, D., Ragusa, D., et al. (2011). Prevalence of red ear syndrome in juvenile primary headaches. CEPHALALGIA, 31(5), 597-602.

Prevalence of red ear syndrome in juvenile primary headaches.

BRIGHINA, Filippo;SAVETTIERI, Giovanni;D'AMELIO, Marco
2011-01-01

Abstract

Background: Previous studies have suggested a relationship between ‘red ear syndrome’ (RES) and pediatric migraine. Aims of this study were (i) to assess the frequency, specificity and sensitivity of RES in a population of pediatric migraineurs and (ii) to establish the pathophysiological mechanisms of RES associated with migraine. Methods and results: A total of 226 children suffering from headache (aged 4–17 years) were enrolled. One hundred and seventy-two (76.4%) were affected by migraine, the remaining 54 (23.6%) by other primary headaches. RES was followed significantly more frequently by migraine (23.3%; p<.0001), and was characterized by high specificity and positive predictive value (96.3 and 95.3%, respectively). According to the univariate statistical analysis, RES showed a statistically significant association with male gender, throbbing quality of the pain, vomiting and phonophobia. It was confirmed by a multivariate stepwise logistic regression model only for the throbbing quality of the pain, vomiting and male gender. Conclusions: Our study showed that (i) in children, RES is a highly specific sign for migraine. In addition, the evidence of an association of RES with some migraine features partially provoked by the parasympathetic system supports the hypothesis of a shared pathophysiological background (e.g. via the activation of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex).
Settore MED/26 - Neurologia
Raieli, V., Compagno, A., Brighina, F., La Franca, G., Puma, D., Ragusa, D., et al. (2011). Prevalence of red ear syndrome in juvenile primary headaches. CEPHALALGIA, 31(5), 597-602.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/55498
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