The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (ICHD3) defines Short-lasting Unilateral Neuralgiform Headache Attacks (SUNHA) as attacks of moderate or severe, strictly unilateral head pain lasting from seconds to minutes, occurring at least once a day and usually associated with prominent lacrimation and redness of the ipsilateral eye. Two subtypes of SUNHA are identified: Short-lasting Unilateral Neuralgiform headache attacks with Conjunctival injection and Tearing (SUNCT) and Short-lasting Unilateral Neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial Autonomic symptoms (SUNA). These pathologies are infrequent in children and difficult to diagnose. The authors reviewed the existing literature on SUNCT and SUNA, especially in the developmental age, which describes the pathophysiology in detail and focuses on the therapeutic options available to date. SUNHA-type headaches must be considered on the one hand, for the possibility of the onset of forms secondary to underlying pathologies even of a neoplastic nature, and on the other hand, for the negative impact they can have on an individual’s quality of life, particularly in young patients. Until now, published cases suggest that no chronic variants occur in childhood and adolescents. In light of this evidence, the authors offer a review that may serve as a source to be drawn upon in the implementation of suitable treatments in children and adolescents suffering from these headaches, focusing on therapies that are non-invasive and as risk-free as possible for pediatric patients.

Cesaroni C.A., Pruccoli J., Bergonzini L., Quatrosi G., Vetri L., Roccella M., et al. (2021). SUNCT/SUNA in pediatric age: A review of pathophysiology and therapeutic options. BRAIN SCIENCES, 11(9) [10.3390/brainsci11091252].

SUNCT/SUNA in pediatric age: A review of pathophysiology and therapeutic options

Quatrosi G.;Vetri L.;Roccella M.;
2021

Abstract

The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (ICHD3) defines Short-lasting Unilateral Neuralgiform Headache Attacks (SUNHA) as attacks of moderate or severe, strictly unilateral head pain lasting from seconds to minutes, occurring at least once a day and usually associated with prominent lacrimation and redness of the ipsilateral eye. Two subtypes of SUNHA are identified: Short-lasting Unilateral Neuralgiform headache attacks with Conjunctival injection and Tearing (SUNCT) and Short-lasting Unilateral Neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial Autonomic symptoms (SUNA). These pathologies are infrequent in children and difficult to diagnose. The authors reviewed the existing literature on SUNCT and SUNA, especially in the developmental age, which describes the pathophysiology in detail and focuses on the therapeutic options available to date. SUNHA-type headaches must be considered on the one hand, for the possibility of the onset of forms secondary to underlying pathologies even of a neoplastic nature, and on the other hand, for the negative impact they can have on an individual’s quality of life, particularly in young patients. Until now, published cases suggest that no chronic variants occur in childhood and adolescents. In light of this evidence, the authors offer a review that may serve as a source to be drawn upon in the implementation of suitable treatments in children and adolescents suffering from these headaches, focusing on therapies that are non-invasive and as risk-free as possible for pediatric patients.
Cesaroni C.A., Pruccoli J., Bergonzini L., Quatrosi G., Vetri L., Roccella M., et al. (2021). SUNCT/SUNA in pediatric age: A review of pathophysiology and therapeutic options. BRAIN SCIENCES, 11(9) [10.3390/brainsci11091252].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10447/522339
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