Aim. To assess the role of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed with a low-field scanner in the detection of floating meniscus sign as a consequence of sports-related trauma. Methods. Retrospective review of 2436 MR knee examinations executed, in 18 months, using a low-field scanner of 0.2T, was performed by three musculoskeletal radiologists of varying experience. Diagnostic criteria to define the presence of a complete floating meniscus were as codified in the literature, lithe thickness of the fluid signal band between the meniscus and tibial plateau was comprised in the range >= 3 mm and <= 5 mm the floating meniscus was defined as partial. Patients with the sign were called to learn what treatment had been performed; in those submitted to surgery the surgical chart was evaluated. Results. Floating meniscus was detected in 8/2436 cases (0.25%), 5 complete, arthroscopically confirmed, and 3 partial; in 5/8 cases the lateral meniscus was involved. Associated lesions were observed, ligamentous in 7/8 cases and meniscal in 2/8 cases; a bone bruise of varied extension was identified in 3/8 cases. Conclusion. Floating meniscus sign could be detected at MR imaging although performed using a low-field scanner. Its presence should be carefully identified, especially in severe traumatic events, as it has some important prognostic implications.

Francavilla, G., Iovane, A., Sorrentino, F., Candela, F., Sutera, R., Sanfilippo, A., et al. (2010). Role of low-field magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of floating meniscus sign as consequence of sport-related trauma. MEDICINA DELLO SPORT, 63(2), 255-264.

Role of low-field magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of floating meniscus sign as consequence of sport-related trauma

FRANCAVILLA, Giuseppe;IOVANE, Angelo;SORRENTINO, Fortunato;SUTERA, Raffaello;SANFILIPPO, Antonino;FRANCAVILLA, Vincenzo Cristian;D'ARIENZO, Michele
2010

Abstract

Aim. To assess the role of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed with a low-field scanner in the detection of floating meniscus sign as a consequence of sports-related trauma. Methods. Retrospective review of 2436 MR knee examinations executed, in 18 months, using a low-field scanner of 0.2T, was performed by three musculoskeletal radiologists of varying experience. Diagnostic criteria to define the presence of a complete floating meniscus were as codified in the literature, lithe thickness of the fluid signal band between the meniscus and tibial plateau was comprised in the range >= 3 mm and <= 5 mm the floating meniscus was defined as partial. Patients with the sign were called to learn what treatment had been performed; in those submitted to surgery the surgical chart was evaluated. Results. Floating meniscus was detected in 8/2436 cases (0.25%), 5 complete, arthroscopically confirmed, and 3 partial; in 5/8 cases the lateral meniscus was involved. Associated lesions were observed, ligamentous in 7/8 cases and meniscal in 2/8 cases; a bone bruise of varied extension was identified in 3/8 cases. Conclusion. Floating meniscus sign could be detected at MR imaging although performed using a low-field scanner. Its presence should be carefully identified, especially in severe traumatic events, as it has some important prognostic implications.
Francavilla, G., Iovane, A., Sorrentino, F., Candela, F., Sutera, R., Sanfilippo, A., et al. (2010). Role of low-field magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of floating meniscus sign as consequence of sport-related trauma. MEDICINA DELLO SPORT, 63(2), 255-264.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10447/50753
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