Purpose: Although high serum uric acid (SUA) levels are associated with negative outcomes in older people, recent studies reported that hyperuricemia could help protect against the onset of bone fractures. We consequently examined whether baseline SUA levels were associated with risk of incident osteoporotic fractures in a representative group of elderly people with no fractures or other bone-modifying conditions or drugs at the baseline. Methods: Among 3099 people aged ≥ 65. years initially involved in the PRO.V.A. study, 1586 participants with no prior diagnosis of osteoporotic fractures, and no conditions or medication affecting bone metabolism at the baseline were followed up for 4.4. ±. 1.2. years. Baseline SUA levels were classified in gender-specific quintiles. Incident osteoporotic fractures were considered as any new fractures occurring at the usual sites of osteoporotic fractures. Results: At the baseline, participants with higher SUA levels had significantly less osteoporosis and lower serum beta cross-laps levels, but higher serum parathormone concentrations irrespective of gender. Over a 4.4-year follow-up, 185 subjects were diagnosed with a new osteoporotic fracture, giving rise to an incidence of 25 events per 1000. person-years. Cox's regression analysis, adjusted for potential baseline and follow-up confounders, revealed no relationship between high SUA levels and incident fractures during the follow-up in the sample as a whole (p for trend. =. 0.46) or by gender (p for trend. =. 0.14 in males and 0.64 in females). Conclusions: Baseline SUA concentrations were not associated with the onset of new osteoporotic fractures over a 4.4-year follow-up in our sample of community-dwelling older men and women. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

Veronese, N., Bolzetta, F., De Rui, M., Maggi, S., Noale, M., Zambon, S., et al. (2015). Serum uric acid and incident osteoporotic fractures in old people: The PRO.V.A study. BONE, 79, 183-189 [10.1016/j.bone.2015.06.005].

Serum uric acid and incident osteoporotic fractures in old people: The PRO.V.A study

Veronese, N.;
2015-01-01

Abstract

Purpose: Although high serum uric acid (SUA) levels are associated with negative outcomes in older people, recent studies reported that hyperuricemia could help protect against the onset of bone fractures. We consequently examined whether baseline SUA levels were associated with risk of incident osteoporotic fractures in a representative group of elderly people with no fractures or other bone-modifying conditions or drugs at the baseline. Methods: Among 3099 people aged ≥ 65. years initially involved in the PRO.V.A. study, 1586 participants with no prior diagnosis of osteoporotic fractures, and no conditions or medication affecting bone metabolism at the baseline were followed up for 4.4. ±. 1.2. years. Baseline SUA levels were classified in gender-specific quintiles. Incident osteoporotic fractures were considered as any new fractures occurring at the usual sites of osteoporotic fractures. Results: At the baseline, participants with higher SUA levels had significantly less osteoporosis and lower serum beta cross-laps levels, but higher serum parathormone concentrations irrespective of gender. Over a 4.4-year follow-up, 185 subjects were diagnosed with a new osteoporotic fracture, giving rise to an incidence of 25 events per 1000. person-years. Cox's regression analysis, adjusted for potential baseline and follow-up confounders, revealed no relationship between high SUA levels and incident fractures during the follow-up in the sample as a whole (p for trend. =. 0.46) or by gender (p for trend. =. 0.14 in males and 0.64 in females). Conclusions: Baseline SUA concentrations were not associated with the onset of new osteoporotic fractures over a 4.4-year follow-up in our sample of community-dwelling older men and women. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.
Veronese, N., Bolzetta, F., De Rui, M., Maggi, S., Noale, M., Zambon, S., et al. (2015). Serum uric acid and incident osteoporotic fractures in old people: The PRO.V.A study. BONE, 79, 183-189 [10.1016/j.bone.2015.06.005].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/462958
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