Sierra Leone is the country with highest maternal mortality and infections are the underlying cause in 11% of maternal deaths, but the real burden remains unknown. This study aims to determine the incidence and risk factors of surgical site infection (SSI) post-caesarean section (CS) in women admitted to Princess Christian Maternity Hospital (PCMH) in Freetown, Sierra Leone. A prospective case-control (1:3 ratio) study was implemented from 1 May 2018 to 30 April 2019 and 11 women presenting with suspected or confirmed infection post-CS were screened for inclusion as a case. For each case, three patients undergoing CS on the same day and admitted to the same ward, but not presenting with SSI, were selected as controls. The post-CS infection rate was 10.9%. Two hundred and fifty-four clinically confirmed cases were enrolled and matched with 762 control patients. By multivariable analysis, the risk factors for SSI were: being single (odds ratio (OR) 1.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36-1.66), low education level (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.55-1.84), previous CS (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.10-1.52), presenting with premature membranes rupture (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.18-1.88), a long decision-incision time (OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.74-2.24) and a high missing post-CS antibiotic doses rate (OR 2.52, 95% CI 2.10-2.85). Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press.

Di Gennaro, F., Marotta, C., Pisani, L., Veronese, N., Pisani, V., Lippolis, V., et al. (2020). Maternal caesarean section infection (MACSI) in Sierra Leone: a case-control study. EPIDEMIOLOGY AND INFECTION [10.1017/S0950268820000370].

Maternal caesarean section infection (MACSI) in Sierra Leone: a case-control study

Veronese, N.;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Sierra Leone is the country with highest maternal mortality and infections are the underlying cause in 11% of maternal deaths, but the real burden remains unknown. This study aims to determine the incidence and risk factors of surgical site infection (SSI) post-caesarean section (CS) in women admitted to Princess Christian Maternity Hospital (PCMH) in Freetown, Sierra Leone. A prospective case-control (1:3 ratio) study was implemented from 1 May 2018 to 30 April 2019 and 11 women presenting with suspected or confirmed infection post-CS were screened for inclusion as a case. For each case, three patients undergoing CS on the same day and admitted to the same ward, but not presenting with SSI, were selected as controls. The post-CS infection rate was 10.9%. Two hundred and fifty-four clinically confirmed cases were enrolled and matched with 762 control patients. By multivariable analysis, the risk factors for SSI were: being single (odds ratio (OR) 1.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36-1.66), low education level (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.55-1.84), previous CS (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.10-1.52), presenting with premature membranes rupture (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.18-1.88), a long decision-incision time (OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.74-2.24) and a high missing post-CS antibiotic doses rate (OR 2.52, 95% CI 2.10-2.85). Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press.
Di Gennaro, F., Marotta, C., Pisani, L., Veronese, N., Pisani, V., Lippolis, V., et al. (2020). Maternal caesarean section infection (MACSI) in Sierra Leone: a case-control study. EPIDEMIOLOGY AND INFECTION [10.1017/S0950268820000370].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/460174
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