Objective: To evaluate the antidepressant effects of exercise in older adults, using randomized controlled trial (RCT) data. Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis of exercise in older adults, addressing limitations of previous works. RCTs of exercise interventions in older people with depression (≥ 60 years) comparing exercise vs. control were eligible. A random-effects meta-analysis calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD) (95% confidence interval [95%CI]), meta-regressions, and trim, fill, and fail-safe number analyses were conducted. Results: Eight RCTs were included, representing 138 participants in exercise arms and 129 controls. Exercise had a large and significant effect on depression (SMD =-0.90 [95%CI-0.29 to-1.51]), with a fail-safe number of 71 studies. Significant effects were found for 1) mixed aerobic and anaerobic interventions, 2) at moderate intensity, 3) that were group-based, 4) that utilized mixed supervised and unsupervised formats, and 5) in people without other clinical comorbidities. Conclusion: Adjusting for publication bias increased the beneficial effects of exercise in three subgroup analysis, suggesting that previous meta-analyses have underestimated the benefits of exercise due to publication bias. We advocate that exercise be considered as a routine component of the management of depression in older adults. © 2016, Associacao Brasileira de Psiquiatria. All rights reserved.

Schuch, F., Vancampfort, D., Rosenbaum, S., Richards, J., Ward, P., Veronese, N., et al. (2016). Exercise for depression in older adults: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials adjusting for publication bias. REVISTA BRASILEIRA DE PSIQUIATRIA, 38(3), 247-254 [10.1590/1516-4446-2016-1915].

Exercise for depression in older adults: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials adjusting for publication bias

Veronese, N.;
2016-01-01

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the antidepressant effects of exercise in older adults, using randomized controlled trial (RCT) data. Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis of exercise in older adults, addressing limitations of previous works. RCTs of exercise interventions in older people with depression (≥ 60 years) comparing exercise vs. control were eligible. A random-effects meta-analysis calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD) (95% confidence interval [95%CI]), meta-regressions, and trim, fill, and fail-safe number analyses were conducted. Results: Eight RCTs were included, representing 138 participants in exercise arms and 129 controls. Exercise had a large and significant effect on depression (SMD =-0.90 [95%CI-0.29 to-1.51]), with a fail-safe number of 71 studies. Significant effects were found for 1) mixed aerobic and anaerobic interventions, 2) at moderate intensity, 3) that were group-based, 4) that utilized mixed supervised and unsupervised formats, and 5) in people without other clinical comorbidities. Conclusion: Adjusting for publication bias increased the beneficial effects of exercise in three subgroup analysis, suggesting that previous meta-analyses have underestimated the benefits of exercise due to publication bias. We advocate that exercise be considered as a routine component of the management of depression in older adults. © 2016, Associacao Brasileira de Psiquiatria. All rights reserved.
https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84984597005&doi=10.1590/1516-4446-2016-1915&partnerID=40&md5=de3ec4be1599ba0c9355e221babfca62
Schuch, F., Vancampfort, D., Rosenbaum, S., Richards, J., Ward, P., Veronese, N., et al. (2016). Exercise for depression in older adults: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials adjusting for publication bias. REVISTA BRASILEIRA DE PSIQUIATRIA, 38(3), 247-254 [10.1590/1516-4446-2016-1915].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/455231
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