The continuous growth of urban areas and the increasing public awareness of the environmental impacts of storm water have raised interest on the quality of the receiving water bodies. In the past two decades, many efforts have been directed at improving urban drainage systems by introducing mitigation measures to limit the negative environmental impacts of storm water. These mitigation measures are generally called best management practices (BMPs), sustainable urban drainage systems, or low impact developments, and they include practices such as infiltration and storage tanks that reduce the peak flow and retain some of the polluting materials. Choosing the best mitigation measure is still a controversial topic. To gain insight on the best technique, this study compares different distributed and centralized urban storm-water management techniques, including infiltration and storage facilities. The main objective of this study is to use modeling to assess the effects of the different urban drainage techniques. To this end, a homemade model that was developed in previous studies is applied. This model enables us to simulate both combined sewer systems and ancillary structures such as storm tanks or infiltration trenches to determine water quantity and quality characteristics. A long-term simulation is employed to account for the effects of sediments in BMPs, which generally reduce the hydraulic capacity. The results allow us to draw some conclusions on the peculiarities of BMP techniques, on the possibility of integrating different techniques for improving efficiency, and on BMP maintenance planning.

Freni, G., Mannina, G., & Viviani, G. (2010). Urban Storm-Water Quality Management: Centralized versus Source Control. JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT, 136(2), 268-278 [10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9496(2010)136:2(268)].

Urban Storm-Water Quality Management: Centralized versus Source Control

MANNINA, Giorgio;VIVIANI, Gaspare
2010

Abstract

The continuous growth of urban areas and the increasing public awareness of the environmental impacts of storm water have raised interest on the quality of the receiving water bodies. In the past two decades, many efforts have been directed at improving urban drainage systems by introducing mitigation measures to limit the negative environmental impacts of storm water. These mitigation measures are generally called best management practices (BMPs), sustainable urban drainage systems, or low impact developments, and they include practices such as infiltration and storage tanks that reduce the peak flow and retain some of the polluting materials. Choosing the best mitigation measure is still a controversial topic. To gain insight on the best technique, this study compares different distributed and centralized urban storm-water management techniques, including infiltration and storage facilities. The main objective of this study is to use modeling to assess the effects of the different urban drainage techniques. To this end, a homemade model that was developed in previous studies is applied. This model enables us to simulate both combined sewer systems and ancillary structures such as storm tanks or infiltration trenches to determine water quantity and quality characteristics. A long-term simulation is employed to account for the effects of sediments in BMPs, which generally reduce the hydraulic capacity. The results allow us to draw some conclusions on the peculiarities of BMP techniques, on the possibility of integrating different techniques for improving efficiency, and on BMP maintenance planning.
Settore ICAR/03 - Ingegneria Sanitaria-Ambientale
https://ascelibrary.org/doi/10.1061/%28ASCE%290733-9496%282010%29136%3A2%28268%29
Freni, G., Mannina, G., & Viviani, G. (2010). Urban Storm-Water Quality Management: Centralized versus Source Control. JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT, 136(2), 268-278 [10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9496(2010)136:2(268)].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10447/44926
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