Few studies assessed the associations between dietary vitamin K and depressive symptoms. We aimed to investigate the association between dietary vitamin K and depressive symptoms in a large cohort of North American People. In this cross-sectional analysis, 4,375 participants that were aged 45-79 years from the Osteoarthritis Initiative were included. Dietary vitamin K intake was collected through a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and categorized in quartiles. Depressive symptoms were diagnosed using the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) ≥ 16. To investigate the associations between vitamin K intake and depressive symptoms, logistic regression analysis were run, which adjusted for potential confounders. Overall, 437 (=10%) subjects had depressive symptoms. After adjusting for 11 confounders, people with the highest dietary vitamin K intake had lower odds of having depressive symptoms (OR = 0.58; 95%CI: 0.43-0.80). This effect was only present in people not taking vitamin D supplementation. In conclusion, higher dietary vitamin K intake was significantly associated with a lower presence of depressive symptoms, also after accounting for potential confounders. Future longitudinal research is required to explore the directionality of the association. © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Bolzetta, F., Veronese, N., Stubbs, B., Noale, M., Vaona, A., Demurtas, J., et al. (2019). The relationship between dietary vitamin k and depressive symptoms in late adulthood: A cross-sectional analysis from a large cohort study. NUTRIENTS, 11(4), 1-10 [10.3390/nu11040787].

The relationship between dietary vitamin k and depressive symptoms in late adulthood: A cross-sectional analysis from a large cohort study

Veronese, N.;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Few studies assessed the associations between dietary vitamin K and depressive symptoms. We aimed to investigate the association between dietary vitamin K and depressive symptoms in a large cohort of North American People. In this cross-sectional analysis, 4,375 participants that were aged 45-79 years from the Osteoarthritis Initiative were included. Dietary vitamin K intake was collected through a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and categorized in quartiles. Depressive symptoms were diagnosed using the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) ≥ 16. To investigate the associations between vitamin K intake and depressive symptoms, logistic regression analysis were run, which adjusted for potential confounders. Overall, 437 (=10%) subjects had depressive symptoms. After adjusting for 11 confounders, people with the highest dietary vitamin K intake had lower odds of having depressive symptoms (OR = 0.58; 95%CI: 0.43-0.80). This effect was only present in people not taking vitamin D supplementation. In conclusion, higher dietary vitamin K intake was significantly associated with a lower presence of depressive symptoms, also after accounting for potential confounders. Future longitudinal research is required to explore the directionality of the association. © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85064540995&doi=10.3390/nu11040787&partnerID=40&md5=94ca6cf5729c66b738f738129a670da6
Bolzetta, F., Veronese, N., Stubbs, B., Noale, M., Vaona, A., Demurtas, J., et al. (2019). The relationship between dietary vitamin k and depressive symptoms in late adulthood: A cross-sectional analysis from a large cohort study. NUTRIENTS, 11(4), 1-10 [10.3390/nu11040787].
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
nutrients-11-00787.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Versione Editoriale
Dimensione 513.08 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
513.08 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/448773
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 14
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 15
social impact