Fruit and vegetable consumption may protect against sarcopenia but there are no studies on this topic from low‐ and middle‐income countries (LMICs). Thus, we assessed this association among older adults from six LMICs. Community‐based cross‐sectional data of the Study on Global Aging and Adult Health were analyzed. Sarcopenia was defined as the presence of low skeletal muscle mass based on indirect population formula, and either slow gait or low handgrip strength. Quintiles of vegetable and fruit consumption were created based on the number of servings consumed on a typical day. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted. The sample consisted of 14,585 individuals aged ≥65 years (mean (SD) age 72.6 (11.4) years; 55% females). Adjusted analyses showed that overall, compared to the lowest quintile (Q1), the highest quintile (Q5) of fruit consumption was associated with a 40% lower odds for sarcopenia (OR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.42-0.84) but this association was largely driven by the strong association among females (e.g., Q5 vs. Q1 OR = 0.42; 95% CI = 0.24−0.73), with no significant associations found among males. Vegetable consumption was not significantly associated with sarcopenia. Future studies of longitudinal design may shed light on whether increasing fruit consumption among older females in LMICs may reduce risk for sarcopenia. © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Koyanagi, A., Veronese, N., Solmi, M., Oh, H., Shin, J., Jacob, L., et al. (2020). Fruit and vegetable consumption and sarcopenia among older adults in low- and middle-income countries. NUTRIENTS, 12(3) [10.3390/nu12030706].

Fruit and vegetable consumption and sarcopenia among older adults in low- and middle-income countries

Veronese, N.;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Fruit and vegetable consumption may protect against sarcopenia but there are no studies on this topic from low‐ and middle‐income countries (LMICs). Thus, we assessed this association among older adults from six LMICs. Community‐based cross‐sectional data of the Study on Global Aging and Adult Health were analyzed. Sarcopenia was defined as the presence of low skeletal muscle mass based on indirect population formula, and either slow gait or low handgrip strength. Quintiles of vegetable and fruit consumption were created based on the number of servings consumed on a typical day. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted. The sample consisted of 14,585 individuals aged ≥65 years (mean (SD) age 72.6 (11.4) years; 55% females). Adjusted analyses showed that overall, compared to the lowest quintile (Q1), the highest quintile (Q5) of fruit consumption was associated with a 40% lower odds for sarcopenia (OR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.42-0.84) but this association was largely driven by the strong association among females (e.g., Q5 vs. Q1 OR = 0.42; 95% CI = 0.24−0.73), with no significant associations found among males. Vegetable consumption was not significantly associated with sarcopenia. Future studies of longitudinal design may shed light on whether increasing fruit consumption among older females in LMICs may reduce risk for sarcopenia. © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85081241936&doi=10.3390/nu12030706&partnerID=40&md5=3238dd312c5e5355ff65ca69a2b30966
Koyanagi, A., Veronese, N., Solmi, M., Oh, H., Shin, J., Jacob, L., et al. (2020). Fruit and vegetable consumption and sarcopenia among older adults in low- and middle-income countries. NUTRIENTS, 12(3) [10.3390/nu12030706].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/448752
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