It has been shown that sexual hormones have an opposite effect on hepatic fibrosis progression and hepatocellular carcinoma development. Sex differences among 2,762 chronic HBsAg carriers consecutively referring Italian hospitals in 2001 and in 2007 have been evaluated, particularly focusing on the role of gender on severity of liver disease. The overall sex ratio (males/females) was 2.6. Females were more likely born abroad and new diagnosis cases; but less likely HIV coinfected. No sex difference was observed regarding coinfection with other hepatitis viruses. The sex ratio linearly increased with increasing severity of liver disease, being 1.3 in normal ALT, 2.8 in chronic hepatitis, 3.6 in liver cirrhosis, and 6.8 in hepatocellular carcinoma. Adjustment by multiple logistic regression analysis for the confounding effect of age, alcohol intake, HDV infection, HCV infection, and BMI shows that male gender is an independent predictor of the likelihood of more severe liver disease (O.R. 1.7; C.I. 95%=1.3-2.1). HBV-DNA levels resulted not associated with the outcome of chronic HBV infection. Despite some potential risk factors associated with liver disease, such as HBV genotype or mutations, not having been controlled for due to lack of availability, the observed sex disparity in the outcome of chronic HBV infection may support biological obervation that HBV infection could be considered a sex hormone-responsive virus.

Stroffolini T., Esvan R., Biliotti E., Sagnelli E., Gaeta G.B., Almasio P.L. (2015). Gender differences in chronic HBsAg carriers in Italy: Evidence for the independent role of male sex in severity of liver disease. JOURNAL OF MEDICAL VIROLOGY, 87(11), 1899-1903 [10.1002/jmv.24243].

Gender differences in chronic HBsAg carriers in Italy: Evidence for the independent role of male sex in severity of liver disease

Almasio P. L.
2015-01-01

Abstract

It has been shown that sexual hormones have an opposite effect on hepatic fibrosis progression and hepatocellular carcinoma development. Sex differences among 2,762 chronic HBsAg carriers consecutively referring Italian hospitals in 2001 and in 2007 have been evaluated, particularly focusing on the role of gender on severity of liver disease. The overall sex ratio (males/females) was 2.6. Females were more likely born abroad and new diagnosis cases; but less likely HIV coinfected. No sex difference was observed regarding coinfection with other hepatitis viruses. The sex ratio linearly increased with increasing severity of liver disease, being 1.3 in normal ALT, 2.8 in chronic hepatitis, 3.6 in liver cirrhosis, and 6.8 in hepatocellular carcinoma. Adjustment by multiple logistic regression analysis for the confounding effect of age, alcohol intake, HDV infection, HCV infection, and BMI shows that male gender is an independent predictor of the likelihood of more severe liver disease (O.R. 1.7; C.I. 95%=1.3-2.1). HBV-DNA levels resulted not associated with the outcome of chronic HBV infection. Despite some potential risk factors associated with liver disease, such as HBV genotype or mutations, not having been controlled for due to lack of availability, the observed sex disparity in the outcome of chronic HBV infection may support biological obervation that HBV infection could be considered a sex hormone-responsive virus.
Stroffolini T., Esvan R., Biliotti E., Sagnelli E., Gaeta G.B., Almasio P.L. (2015). Gender differences in chronic HBsAg carriers in Italy: Evidence for the independent role of male sex in severity of liver disease. JOURNAL OF MEDICAL VIROLOGY, 87(11), 1899-1903 [10.1002/jmv.24243].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/415778
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