This research explored the preferences and buying habits of a sample of 620 consumers of fresh-cut, ready-to-eat salads. A best–worst scaling approach was used to measure the level of preference stated by individuals regarding 12 attributes for quality (intrinsic, extrinsic and credence) of fresh-cut salads. The experiment was carried out through direct interviews at several large-scale retail outlets in the Turin metropolitan area (north-west of Italy). Out of the total number of questioned consumers, 35% said they did not consume fresh-cut salads. On the contrary, the rest of the involved sample expressed the highest degree of preference towards the freshness/appearance attribute, followed by the expiration date and the brand. On the contrary, attributes such as price, organic certification and food safety did not emerge as discriminating factors in consumer choices. Additionally, five clusters of consumers were identified, whose preferences are related both to purchasing styles and socio-demographic variables. In conclusion, this research has highlighted the positive attitude of consumers towards quality products backed by a brand, providing ideas for companies to improve within this sector and implement strategies to answer the needs of a new segment of consumers, by determining market opportunities that aim to strengthen local brands.

Massaglia S., Merlino V.M., Borra D., Bargetto A., Sottile F., Peano C. (2019). Consumer attitudes and preference exploration towards fresh-cut salads using best–worst scaling and latent class analysis. FOODS, 8(11), 568-582 [10.3390/foods8110568].

Consumer attitudes and preference exploration towards fresh-cut salads using best–worst scaling and latent class analysis

Sottile F.
Conceptualization
;
2019-01-01

Abstract

This research explored the preferences and buying habits of a sample of 620 consumers of fresh-cut, ready-to-eat salads. A best–worst scaling approach was used to measure the level of preference stated by individuals regarding 12 attributes for quality (intrinsic, extrinsic and credence) of fresh-cut salads. The experiment was carried out through direct interviews at several large-scale retail outlets in the Turin metropolitan area (north-west of Italy). Out of the total number of questioned consumers, 35% said they did not consume fresh-cut salads. On the contrary, the rest of the involved sample expressed the highest degree of preference towards the freshness/appearance attribute, followed by the expiration date and the brand. On the contrary, attributes such as price, organic certification and food safety did not emerge as discriminating factors in consumer choices. Additionally, five clusters of consumers were identified, whose preferences are related both to purchasing styles and socio-demographic variables. In conclusion, this research has highlighted the positive attitude of consumers towards quality products backed by a brand, providing ideas for companies to improve within this sector and implement strategies to answer the needs of a new segment of consumers, by determining market opportunities that aim to strengthen local brands.
Settore AGR/01 - Economia Ed Estimo Rurale
Settore AGR/03 - Arboricoltura Generale E Coltivazioni Arboree
https://www.mdpi.com/2304-8158/8/11/568/pdf
Massaglia S., Merlino V.M., Borra D., Bargetto A., Sottile F., Peano C. (2019). Consumer attitudes and preference exploration towards fresh-cut salads using best–worst scaling and latent class analysis. FOODS, 8(11), 568-582 [10.3390/foods8110568].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/400070
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