Introduction. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of plyometric and isometric training protocol on power in 46 team sports (basketball: n = 23; volleyball: n = 23) players, also in relation to genetic background (i.e., ACE and PPARA genes polymorphisms). Methods. The following tests were administered: squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), drop jump (dJ), sprint, handgrip, and agility test. Genetic analysis was based on saliva samples. Results. The training protocol proved to be effective in improving jump performance in basketball players and volleyball players, respectively: 25-meter sprint test (p = 0.006; p = 0.008); agility test (p = 0.000; p = 0.000); SJ test (p = 0.001; p = 0.000); CMJ test (p = 0.005; p = 0.000); and dJ test (p = 0.03 only for basketball players; dJ test improvement in volleyball players was not significant), regardless of sports practice. Furthermore, data confirm that the 'd' allele of ACE and the 'C' allele of PPARA are positive alleles associated to power and strength performances. Conclusions. The importance to train strength skills should be emphasized, above all through isometric and plyometric exercises, not neglecting the key role played by the genetic background.

Amato A, C.C. (2018). Power training in young athletes: Is it all in the genes?. PHYSIOTHERAPY QUARTERLY, 26(3), 13-17 [10.5114/pq.2018.78372].

Power training in young athletes: Is it all in the genes?

Amato A;Proia P
2018-01-01

Abstract

Introduction. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of plyometric and isometric training protocol on power in 46 team sports (basketball: n = 23; volleyball: n = 23) players, also in relation to genetic background (i.e., ACE and PPARA genes polymorphisms). Methods. The following tests were administered: squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), drop jump (dJ), sprint, handgrip, and agility test. Genetic analysis was based on saliva samples. Results. The training protocol proved to be effective in improving jump performance in basketball players and volleyball players, respectively: 25-meter sprint test (p = 0.006; p = 0.008); agility test (p = 0.000; p = 0.000); SJ test (p = 0.001; p = 0.000); CMJ test (p = 0.005; p = 0.000); and dJ test (p = 0.03 only for basketball players; dJ test improvement in volleyball players was not significant), regardless of sports practice. Furthermore, data confirm that the 'd' allele of ACE and the 'C' allele of PPARA are positive alleles associated to power and strength performances. Conclusions. The importance to train strength skills should be emphasized, above all through isometric and plyometric exercises, not neglecting the key role played by the genetic background.
Amato A, C.C. (2018). Power training in young athletes: Is it all in the genes?. PHYSIOTHERAPY QUARTERLY, 26(3), 13-17 [10.5114/pq.2018.78372].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/339830
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