Fat tail in sheep represents a valuable energy reserve for facing future climate changes. The identification of genes with a role in the fat-tail phenotype may contribute to understanding the physiology of fat deposition and the mechanisms of adaptation. Genotypic data obtained with the OvineSNP50K array in 13 thin-tail sheep breeds from Italy were used to identify selection signatures of fat tail through pairwise thin- versus fat-tail sheep breed comparisons, with the following fat-tail breeds of the Mediterranean area: two unique Italian fat-tail breeds (Barbaresca and Laticauda), a Barbary sheep breed from Libya, Ossimi breed from Egypt, Cyprus Fat-Tail and Chios from the Greek islands Cyprus and Chios, respectively. Fst and c2 values obtained for >40 000 polymorphic markers allowed confirmation of 12 fat-tail associations that were previously reported in Chinese and Iranian breeds. Two of these signals – on OAR 7 and OAR 13 – are in the proximity of two genes – VRTN and BMP2 – with a role in the variation of vertebral number and in fat-tail formation respectively. Two identified signals on OAR 6 and OAR 15 encompass two genes, PDGFRA and PDGFD, involved in the differentiation of preadipocytes. Further signals detected herein were reported in Chinese sheep as signatures of adaptation to desert areas. For several of the detected associations, the known role in either fat deposition or adaptation, thus contributing to revealing the molecular basis underlying mechanisms of energy storage and climate adaptation.

Mastrangelo, S., Moioli, B., Ahbara, A., Latairish, S., Portolano, B., Pilla, F., et al. (2018). Genome-wide scan of fat-tail sheep identifies signals of selection for fat deposition and adaptation. ANIMAL PRODUCTION SCIENCE [10.1071/AN17753].

Genome-wide scan of fat-tail sheep identifies signals of selection for fat deposition and adaptation

Mastrangelo, S.;Portolano, B.;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Fat tail in sheep represents a valuable energy reserve for facing future climate changes. The identification of genes with a role in the fat-tail phenotype may contribute to understanding the physiology of fat deposition and the mechanisms of adaptation. Genotypic data obtained with the OvineSNP50K array in 13 thin-tail sheep breeds from Italy were used to identify selection signatures of fat tail through pairwise thin- versus fat-tail sheep breed comparisons, with the following fat-tail breeds of the Mediterranean area: two unique Italian fat-tail breeds (Barbaresca and Laticauda), a Barbary sheep breed from Libya, Ossimi breed from Egypt, Cyprus Fat-Tail and Chios from the Greek islands Cyprus and Chios, respectively. Fst and c2 values obtained for >40 000 polymorphic markers allowed confirmation of 12 fat-tail associations that were previously reported in Chinese and Iranian breeds. Two of these signals – on OAR 7 and OAR 13 – are in the proximity of two genes – VRTN and BMP2 – with a role in the variation of vertebral number and in fat-tail formation respectively. Two identified signals on OAR 6 and OAR 15 encompass two genes, PDGFRA and PDGFD, involved in the differentiation of preadipocytes. Further signals detected herein were reported in Chinese sheep as signatures of adaptation to desert areas. For several of the detected associations, the known role in either fat deposition or adaptation, thus contributing to revealing the molecular basis underlying mechanisms of energy storage and climate adaptation.
2018
Settore AGR/17 - Zootecnica Generale E Miglioramento Genetico
Mastrangelo, S., Moioli, B., Ahbara, A., Latairish, S., Portolano, B., Pilla, F., et al. (2018). Genome-wide scan of fat-tail sheep identifies signals of selection for fat deposition and adaptation. ANIMAL PRODUCTION SCIENCE [10.1071/AN17753].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10447/292279
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