The involvement of intestinal microbiota and dysbiosis in the pathogenesis for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colorectal cancer (CRC) is a well-established factto be taken into real consideration when developing targeted therapies. This review aims to depict how advances in our understanding of the role of intestinal flora in the pathogenesis of IBD and CRC are shaping up the therapeutic protocols of their management. It is demonstrated of their management. It is demostrated that there is a circadian regulation of colocyte gene expression in response to microbiota. Dysbiosis leading to a decrease in microbiome biodiversity is also described in IBD patients in IBD patients whereby thick layers of adherent mucosa associated bacteria exist both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's Disease (CD). Probiotics based approaches using lactobacilli and bifidobacteria improved clinical symptoms of IBD's through the GALT immune modulation. In addition, microbiota transplantation has also been used for IBD treatment. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) consists of transferring gastrointestinal microbiota from a healthy donor to an IBD patient by duodenal infusion of liquid stool suspension to establish microbial homeostasis. the destruction of mucosal integrity fscilitates the passage of bacteria in the injured zone to trigger chronic inflammation, eventually leading to CRC development by creating a carcinogenic environment. Actually, a high level of fusobacterium nucleatum and other bacteria are prevalent in CRC patients, thus suggesting a potential role of these organism in the initiation and progression due to thew production of genotoxic metabolities causing a dfirect damage to DNA integrity. Besides, regular probiotics intake may actively prevent the whole process.

Tomasello, G., Tralongo, P., Jurjus, A., Hisham, D., Inaya, H., Matar, M., et al. (2015). TARGETED THERAPIES FOR INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES AND COLORECTAL CANCER: AN INCREASING NEED FOR MICROBIOTA-INTESTINAL MUTUALISM. JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE, 2(3), 123-129 [10.11910/2227-6394.2015.03.02.11].

TARGETED THERAPIES FOR INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES AND COLORECTAL CANCER: AN INCREASING NEED FOR MICROBIOTA-INTESTINAL MUTUALISM

Tomasello,G;Tralongo,P;Leone,A
2015

Abstract

The involvement of intestinal microbiota and dysbiosis in the pathogenesis for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colorectal cancer (CRC) is a well-established factto be taken into real consideration when developing targeted therapies. This review aims to depict how advances in our understanding of the role of intestinal flora in the pathogenesis of IBD and CRC are shaping up the therapeutic protocols of their management. It is demonstrated of their management. It is demostrated that there is a circadian regulation of colocyte gene expression in response to microbiota. Dysbiosis leading to a decrease in microbiome biodiversity is also described in IBD patients in IBD patients whereby thick layers of adherent mucosa associated bacteria exist both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's Disease (CD). Probiotics based approaches using lactobacilli and bifidobacteria improved clinical symptoms of IBD's through the GALT immune modulation. In addition, microbiota transplantation has also been used for IBD treatment. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) consists of transferring gastrointestinal microbiota from a healthy donor to an IBD patient by duodenal infusion of liquid stool suspension to establish microbial homeostasis. the destruction of mucosal integrity fscilitates the passage of bacteria in the injured zone to trigger chronic inflammation, eventually leading to CRC development by creating a carcinogenic environment. Actually, a high level of fusobacterium nucleatum and other bacteria are prevalent in CRC patients, thus suggesting a potential role of these organism in the initiation and progression due to thew production of genotoxic metabolities causing a dfirect damage to DNA integrity. Besides, regular probiotics intake may actively prevent the whole process.
Settore MED/18 - Chirurgia Generale
Settore BIO/06 - Anatomia Comparata E Citologia
Tomasello, G., Tralongo, P., Jurjus, A., Hisham, D., Inaya, H., Matar, M., et al. (2015). TARGETED THERAPIES FOR INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES AND COLORECTAL CANCER: AN INCREASING NEED FOR MICROBIOTA-INTESTINAL MUTUALISM. JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE, 2(3), 123-129 [10.11910/2227-6394.2015.03.02.11].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10447/136800
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