X-ray emission from about 10 protostellar jets has been discovered and it appears as a feature common to the most energetic jets. Although X-ray emission seems to originate from shocks internal to jets, the mechanism forming these shocks remains controversial. One of the best-studied X-ray jets is HH 154, which has been observed by Chandra over a time base of about 10 years. We analyze the Chandra observations of HH 154 by investigating the evolution of its X-ray source. We show that the X-ray emission consists of a bright stationary component and a faint elongated component. We interpret the observations by developing a hydrodynamic model describing a protostellar jet originating from a nozzle and compare the X-ray emission synthesized from the model with the X-ray observations. The model takes into account the thermal conduction and radiative losses and shows that the jet/nozzle leads to the formation of a diamond shock at the nozzle exit. The shock is stationary over the period covered by our simulations and generates an X-ray source with luminosity and spectral characteristics in excellent agreement with the observations. We conclude that the X-ray emission from HH 154 is consistent with a diamond shock originating from a nozzle through which the jet is launched into the ambient medium. We suggest that the physical origin of the nozzle could be related to the dense gas in which the HH 154 driving source is embedded and/or to the magnetic field at the jet launching/collimation region.

Bonito, R., Orlando, S., Miceli, M., Peres, G., Micela, G., & Favata, F. (2011). X-Ray Emission from Protostellar Jet HH 154: The First Evidence of a Diamond Shock?. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL LETTERS, Volume 737, Issue 2(Volume 737, Issue 2) [10.1088/0004-637X/737/2/54].

X-Ray Emission from Protostellar Jet HH 154: The First Evidence of a Diamond Shock?

BONITO, Rosaria;MICELI, Marco;PERES, Giovanni;
2011

Abstract

X-ray emission from about 10 protostellar jets has been discovered and it appears as a feature common to the most energetic jets. Although X-ray emission seems to originate from shocks internal to jets, the mechanism forming these shocks remains controversial. One of the best-studied X-ray jets is HH 154, which has been observed by Chandra over a time base of about 10 years. We analyze the Chandra observations of HH 154 by investigating the evolution of its X-ray source. We show that the X-ray emission consists of a bright stationary component and a faint elongated component. We interpret the observations by developing a hydrodynamic model describing a protostellar jet originating from a nozzle and compare the X-ray emission synthesized from the model with the X-ray observations. The model takes into account the thermal conduction and radiative losses and shows that the jet/nozzle leads to the formation of a diamond shock at the nozzle exit. The shock is stationary over the period covered by our simulations and generates an X-ray source with luminosity and spectral characteristics in excellent agreement with the observations. We conclude that the X-ray emission from HH 154 is consistent with a diamond shock originating from a nozzle through which the jet is launched into the ambient medium. We suggest that the physical origin of the nozzle could be related to the dense gas in which the HH 154 driving source is embedded and/or to the magnetic field at the jet launching/collimation region.
Bonito, R., Orlando, S., Miceli, M., Peres, G., Micela, G., & Favata, F. (2011). X-Ray Emission from Protostellar Jet HH 154: The First Evidence of a Diamond Shock?. THE ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL LETTERS, Volume 737, Issue 2(Volume 737, Issue 2) [10.1088/0004-637X/737/2/54].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10447/100682
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